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Henley's Book of Formulas, Recipes and Processes

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Henley's Twentieth Century Book of Formulas, Recipes and Processes - Pages 776-End

 

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variety. Circassian and Italian walnut, although of the same species, demand widely different treatment in finishing to get the best results.

 

The only way to find the best materials to use in certain cases is to study and experiment with that end in view. If, by aid of a microscope, a certain piece of wood shows the same cellular formation that another piece did which was successfully finished by a certain process, it may be regarded as safe to treat both alike. If observation on this line is indulged in, it will not take the finisher very long to learn just what treatment is best for the work in hand. How often it has been noticed in something of two parts, like a door, that the panels when finished will pit, run, or sag, while the sides will present a surface in every way desirable and vice versa. This is due to the difference in the cellular construction of the wood and to the cellulose, and cannot be otherwise for the parts have been seasoned the same time and treated exactly alike. The physiology of wood is imperfectly understood, but enough is known to warrant us in saying with a certainty that the chemicals in fillers do act upon the principles embodied in its formation.

 

Some tried formulas follow:

 

I.    Make a paste to fill the cracks as follows: Old furniture polish: Whiting, plaster of Paris, pumice stone, litharge, equal parts, Japan drier, boiled linseed oil, turpentine, coloring matter, of each a sufficient quantity.

 

Rub the solids intimately with a mixture of 1 part of the Japan, 2 parts of the linseed oil, and 3 parts of turpentine, coloring to suit with Vandyke brown or sienna. Lay the filling on with a brush,

let it set for about 20 minutes, and then rub off clean except where it is to remain. In 2 days it will be hard enough to polish. After the surface has been thus prepared, the application of a coat of first-class copal varnish is in order. It is recommended that the varnish be applied in a moderately warm room, as it is injured by becoming chilled in drying. To get the best results in varnishing, some skill and experience are required. The varnish must be kept in an evenly warm temperature, and put on neither too plentifully nor too gingerly. After a satisfactorily smooth and regular surface has been obtained, the polishing proper may be done. This may be accomplished by manual labor and dexterity, or by the application of a very thin, even coat of a very fine, transparent varnish.

 

If the hand-polishing method be preferred, it may be pursued by rubbing briskly and thoroughly with the following finishing polish:

 

Alcohol           8 ounces

Shellac           2 drachms

Gum benzoin       2 drachms

Best poppy oil    2 drachms

 

Dissolve the shellac and gum in the alcohol in a warm place, with frequent agitation, and, when cold, add the poppy oil. This may be applied on the end of a cylindrical rubber made by tightly rolling a piece of flannel, which has been torn, not cut, into strips 4 to 6 inches wide. It should be borne in mind that the surface of the cabinet work of a piano is generally veneered, and this being so, necessitates the exercise of much skill and caution in polishing.

 

II.   Prepare a paste from fine starch flour and a thick solution of brown shellac, with the spatula upon a grinding stone, and rub the wooden object with this. After the drying, rub off with sandpaper and polish lightly with a rag moistened with a thin shellac solution and a few drops of oil. The ground thus prepared varnish once or twice and a fine luster will be obtained. This method is well adapted for any wood with large pores, such as oak.

 

Removal of Heat Stains from Polished Wood- Fold a sheet of blotting paper a couple of times (making 4 thicknesses of the paper), cover the place with it, and put a hot smoothing iron thereon. Have ready at hand some bits of flannel, also folded and made quite hot. As soon as the iron has made the surface of the wood quite warm, remove the paper, etc,, and go over the spot with a piece of paraffine, rubbing it hard enough to leave a coating of the substance. Now with one of the hot pieces of flannel rub the injured surface. Continue the rubbing, using freshly warmed cloths until the whiteness leaves the varnish or polish. The operation may have to be repeated.

 

PRESERVATION OF WOOD.

 

I.    An excellent way of preserving wood is to cut it between August and October. The branches are removed, leaving only the leaves at the top. The trunks, carefully cut or sawn (so that their pores remain open), are immediately placed upright, with the lower part immersed in tanks three-quarters filled with water, into which 3 or 4 kilograms of powdered cupric sulphate per hectoliter have been introduced. The mass of

 


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leaves left at the extremity of each trunk is sufficient to cause the ascent of the liquid by means of the capillary force and a reserve of energy in the sap.

 

II.   Wood which can be well preserved may be obtained by making a circular incision in the bark of the trees a certain time before cutting them down. The woodcutters employed in the immense teak forests of Siam have adopted in an empirical way a similar process, which has been productive of good results. The tree is bled, making around the trunk, at the height of 4 feet above ground, a circular incision 8 inches wide and 4 inches deep, at the time when it is in bloom and the sap rising. Sometimes the tree is left standing for 3 years after this operation. Frequently, also, a deep incision reaching the heart is made on two opposite sides, and then it takes sometimes only 6 months to extract the sap.

 

It is probable that it is partly in consequence of this method that the teakwood acquires its exceptional resistance to various destructive agents.

 

III.  A good preservation of piles, stakes, and palisades is obtained by leaving the wood in a bath of cupric sulphate of 4º of the ordinary acidimeter for a time which may vary from 8 to 15 days, according to greater or less dryness of the wood and its size. After they are half dried they are immersed in a bath of lime water; this forms with the sulphate an insoluble compound, preventing the rain from dissolving the sulphate which has penetrated the wood. This process is particularly useful for vine props and the wood of white poplars.

 

A good way to prevent the decay of stakes would be to plant them upside down; that is, to bury the upper extremity of the branch in the ground. In this way, the capillary tubes do not so easily absorb the moisture which is the cause of decay. It frequently happens that for one or another reason, the impregnation of woods designed to be planted in the ground, such as masts, posts, and supports has been neglected. It would be impracticable, after they are placed, to take up these pieces in order to coat them with carbolineum or tar, especially if they are fixed in a wall, masonry, or other structure. Recourse must be had to other means. Near the point where the piece rises from the ground, a hole about one centimeter in width is made in a downward slanting direction, filled with carbolineum, and closed with a wooden plug.

 

It depends upon the consistency of the wood whether the liquid will be absorbed in 1 or 2 days. The hole is filled again for a week. The carbolineum replaces by degrees the water contained in the wood. When it is well impregnated, the hole is definitely closed with a plug of

wood, which is sawn level with the opening. The wood will thus be preserved quite as well as if it had been previously coated with carbolineum.

 

IV.   Wooden objects remaining in the open air may be effectually protected against the inclemency of the weather by means of the following coating: Finely powdered zinc oxide is worked into a paste with water and serves for white-washing walls, garden fences, benches, and other wooden objects. After drying, probably at the end of 2 or 3 hours, the objects must be whitewashed again with a very dilute solution of zinc chloride in glue or water. Zinc oxide and zinc chloride form a brilliant, solid compound, which resists the inclemency of the weather.

 

As a paint for boards, planks for covering greenhouses, garden-frames, etc., Inspector Lucas, of Reutlingen (Würtemberg), has recommended the following coating: Take fresh cement of the best quality, which has been kept in a cool place, work it up with milk on a stone until it is of the consistency of oil paint. The wood designed to receive it must not be smooth, but left rough after sawing. Two or 3 coats are also a protection from fire. Wood to be thus treated must be very dry.

 

V.    Wood treated with creosote resists the attacks of marine animals, such as the teredo. Elm, beech, and fir absorb creosote very readily, provided the wood is sound and dry. Beechwood absorbs it the best. In fir the penetration is complete, when the wood is of a species of rapid growth, and of rather compact grain. Besides, with the aid of pressure it is always possible to force the creosote into the wood. Pieces of wood treated with creosote have resisted for 10 or 11 years under conditions in which oak wood not treated in this way would have been completely destroyed.

 

The prepared wood must remain in store at least 6 months before use. The creosote becomes denser during this time and causes a greater cohesion in the fibers. In certain woods, as pitch pine, the injection is impossible, even under pressure, on account of the presence of rosin in the capillary vessels.

 

VI.   M. Zironi advises heating the wood

 


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in vacuo. The sap is eliminated in this way.

 

Then the receiver is filled with rosin in solution with a hydrocarbide.

The saturation takes place in two hours, when the liquid is allowed to run off, and a jet of vapor is introduced, which carries off the solvent, while the rosin remains in the pores of the wood, increasing its weight considerably.

 

VII.  Wood can be well preserved by impregnating it with a solution of tannate of ferric protoxide. This method is due to Hazfeld.

 

VIII. The Hasselmann process (xylolized wood), which consists in immersing the wood in a saline solution kept boiling under moderate pressure, the liquid containing copper and iron sulphates (20 per cent of the first and 80 per cent of the second), as well as aluminum and kainit, a substance until recently used only as a fertilizer, is now much employed on the railways in Germany.

 

IX.   Recently the discovery has been made that wood may be preserved with dissolved betuline, a vegetable product of the consistency of paste, called also birchwood rosin. Betuline must first be dissolved. It is procurable in the crude state at a low price. The wood is immersed for about 12 hours in the solution, at a temperature of from 57º to 60º F.

 

After the first bath the wood is plunged into a second, formed of a solution of pectic acid of 40º to 45º Bé., and with a certain percentage of an alkaline carbonate for instance, potassium carbonate of commerce in the proportion of 1 part of carbonate to about 4 parts of the solution. The wood remains immersed in this composition for 12 hours; then it is taken out and drained from 8 to 15 hours, the time varying according to the nature of the wood and the temperature. In consequence of this second bath, the betulin which was introduced through the first immersion, is fixed in the interior of the mass. If it is desirable to make the wood more durable and to give it special qualities of density, hardness, and elasticity, it must be submitted to strong pressure. In thus supplementing the chemical with mechanical treatment, the best results are obtained.

 

X.    A receiver of any form or dimensions is filled with a fluid whose boiling point is above 212º F., such as heavy tar oil, saline solutions, etc. This is kept at an intermediate temperature varying between 212º F. and the boiling point; the latter will not be reached, but if into this liquid a piece of wood is plunged, an agitation analogous to boiling is manifested, produced by the water and sap contained in the pores of the wood. These, under the action of a temperature above 212º F., are dissolved into vapor and traverse the bath.

 

If the wood is left immersed and a constant temperature maintained until every trace of agitation has disappeared, the water in the pores of the wood will be expelled, with the exception of a slight quantity, which, being in the form of vapor, represents only the seventeen-hundredth part of the original weight of the water contained; the air which was present in the pores having been likewise expelled.

 

If the liquid is left to cool, this vapor is condensed, forming a vacuum, which is immediately filled under the action of the atmospheric pressure. In this way the wood is completely saturated by the contents of the bath, whatever may be its form, proportions or condensation.

 

To attain the desired effect it is not necessary to employ heavy oils. The latter have, however, the advantage of leaving on the surface of the prepared pieces a kind of varnish, which contributes to protect them against mold, worms, moisture, and dry rot. The same phenomenon of penetration is produced when, without letting the wood grow cold in the bath, it is taken out and plunged immediately into a cold bath of the same or of a different fluid. This point is important, because it is possible to employ as fluids to be absorbed matters having a boiling point below 212º F., and differing in this respect from the first bath, which must be composed of a liquid having a boiling point above 212º F.

 

If, instead of a cold bath of a homogeneous nature, two liquids of different density separated in two layers, are employed, the wood can, with necessary precautions, be immersed successively in them, so that it can be penetrated with given quantities of each. Such liquids are heavy tar oil and a solution of zinc chloride of 2º to 4º Bé. The first, which is denser, remains at the bottom of the vessel, and the second above. If the wood is first immersed in a saline solution, it penetrates deep into the pores, and when finally the heavy oil is absorbed, the latter forms a superficial layer, which prevents the washing out of the saline solution in the interior, as well as the penetration of moisture from the outside.

 


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XI.   Numerous experiments have been made with all kinds of wood, even with hard oak. In the preparation of oak railway ties it was discovered that pieces subjected to a temperature of 212º F. in a bath of heavy tar oil for 4 hours lost from 6 to 7 per cent of their weight, represented by water and albuminous substances, and that they absorbed in heavy oil and zinc chloride enough to represent an increase of from 2 to 3 per cent on their natural original weight. The oak wood in question had been cut for more than a year and was of a density of 1.04 to 1.07.

 

This system offers the advantage of allowing the absorption of antiseptic liquids without any deformation of the constituent elements of the wood, the more as the operation is performed altogether in open vessels. Another advantage is the greater resistance of the wood to warping and bending, and to the extraction of metallic pieces, such as nails, cramp irons, etc.

 

XII.  In the Kyanizing process seasoned timber is soaked in a solution of bichloride of mercury (corrosive sublimate) which coagulates the albumen. The solution is very poisonous and corrodes iron and steel, hence is unsuited for structural purposes in which metallic fastenings are used. The process is effective, but dangerous to the health of the workers employed.

 

XIII. The Wellhouse process also uses zinc chloride, but adds a small percentage of glue. After the timber has been treated under pressure the zinc chloride solution is drawn off and one of tannin is substituted. The tannin combines with the glue and forms an insoluble substance that effectually seals the pores.

 

XIV.  The Allardyce process makes use of zinc chloride and dead oil of tar, the latter being applied last, and the manner of application being essentially the same for both as explained in the other processes.

 

XV.   The timber is boiled in a solution of copper, iron, and aluminum sulphate, to which a small quantity of kainit is added.

 

XVI.  In the creo-rosinate process the timber is first subjected to a steaming process at 200º F. to evaporate the moisture in the cells; the temperature is then gradually increased to 320º F. and a pressure of 80 pounds per square inch. The pressure is slowly reduced to 26 inches vacuum, and then a solution of dead oil of tar, melted rosin, and formaldehyde is injected. After this process the timber is placed in another cylinder where a solution of milk of lime is applied at a temperature of 150º F. and a pressure of 200 pounds per square inch.

 

XVII. The vulcanizing process of treating timber consists essentially in subjecting it to a baking process in hot air which is heated to a temperature of about 500º F. by passing over steam coils. The heat coagulates the albumen, expels the water from the cells, kills the organisms therein, and seals the cells by transforming the sap into a preservative compound. This method is used with success by the elevated railway systems of several cities.

 

XVIII.      A durable coating for wood is obtained by extracting petroleum asphalt, with light petroleum, benzine, or gasoline. For this purpose the asphalt, coarsely powdered, is digested for 1 to 2 days with benzine in well-closed vessels, at a moderately warm spot. Petroleum asphalt results when the distillation of petroleum continued until a glossy, firm, pulverizable mass of conchoidal fracture and resembling colophony in consistency remains. The benzine dissolves from this asphalt only a yellowish-brown dyestuff, which deeply enters the wood and protects it from the action of the weather, worms, dry rot, etc. The paint is not opaque, hence the wood retains its natural fiber. It is very pleasant to look at, because the wood treated with it keeps its natural appearance. The wood can be washed off with soap, and is especially suited for country and summer houses.

 

XIX.  A liquid to preserve wood from mold and dry rot which destroys the albuminous matter of the wood and the organisms which feed on it, so there are neither germs nor food for them if there were any, is sold under the name of carbolineum. The specific gravity of a carbolineum should exceed 1.105, and should give the wood a fine brown color. It should, too, be perfectly waterproof. The three following recipes can be absolutely relied on: a. Heat together and mix thoroughly 95 pounds of coal-tar oil and 5 pounds of asphalt from coal tar. b. Amalgamate together 30 pounds of heavy coal-tar oil, 60 pounds of crude wood-tar oil, and 25 pounds of heavy rosin oil. c. Mix thoroughly 3 pounds of

asphalt, 25 pounds of heavy coal-tar oil, and 40 pounds of heavy rosin oil.

 

XX.   Often the wooden portions of machines are so damaged by dampness prevailing in the shops that the follow-

 


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ing compound will be found useful for their protection: Melt 375 parts of colophony in an iron vessel, and add 10,000 parts of tar, and 500 parts of sulphur. Color with brown ocher or any other coloring matter diluted with linseed oil. Make a first light application of this mixture while warm, and after drying apply a second coat.

 

XXI.  For enameling vats, etc., 1,000 parts of brown shellac and 125 parts of colophony are melted in a spacious kettle. After the mass has cooled somewhat, but is still thinly liquid, 6.1 parts of alcohol (90 per cent) is gradually added. In order to prevent the ignition of the spirit vapor, the admixture of spirit is made at a distance from the stove. By this addition the shellac swells up into a semi-liquid mass, and a larger amount of enamel is obtained than by dissolving it cold. The enamel may be used for wood or iron.

 

The wood must be well dried; only then will the enamel penetrate into the pores. Two or three coats suffice to close up the pores of the wood thoroughly and to render the surface smooth and glossy. Each coating will harden perfectly in several hours. The covering endures a heat of 140º to 150º F. without injury. This glaze can also be mixed with earth colors. Drying quickly and being tasteless, its applications are manifold. Mixed with ocher, for instance, it gives an elegant and durable floor varnish, which may safely be washed off with weak soda solution. If it is not essential that the objects be provided with a smooth and glossy coating, only a preservation being aimed at the following coat is recommended by the same source: Thin, soluble glass (water glass) as it is found in commerce, with about 24 per cent of water, and paint the dry vessel rather hot with this solution. When this has been absorbed, repeat the application, allow to dry, and coat with a solution of about 1 part of sodium bicarbonate in 8 parts of water. In this coating silicic acid is separated by the carbonic acid of the bicarbonate; from the water glass (sodium silicate) absorbed by the pores of the wood, which, as it were, silicifies the wooden surfaces, rendering them resistive against the penetration of liquids. The advantages claimed for both processes are increased durability and facilitated cleaning.

 

XXII. Tar paints, called also mineral or metallic paints, are sold in barrels or boxes, at varying prices. Some dealers color them yellow ocher, red ocher, brown, gray, etc. They are prepared by mixing equal parts of coal tar and oil of turpentine or mineral essence (gasoline).

The product, if it is not colored artificially, is of a brilliant black, even when cold. It dries in a few hours, especially when prepared with oil of turpentine. The paints with mineral essence are, however, generally preferred, on account of their lower cost. Either should be spread on with a hard brush, in coats as thin as possible. They penetrate soft woods, and even semi-hard woods sufficiently deep, and preserve them completely. They adhere perfectly to metals. Their employment can, therefore, be confidently advised, so far as concerns the preservation directly of iron cables, reservoirs, the interior surface of generators, etc. However, it has been shown that atmospheric influence or variations of temperature cause the formation of ammoniacal solutions, which corrode the metals. Several companies for the care and insurance of steam engines have for some time recommended the abandonment of tar products for applications of this kind and the substitution of hot linseed oil.

 

XXIII.      Coal-tar paints are prepared according to various formulas. One in current use has coal tar for a base, with the addition of gum rosin. It is very black. Two thin coats give a fine brilliancy. It is employed on metals, iron, sheet iron, etc., as well as on wood. It dries much quicker than the tars used separately. Its preserving influence against rust is very strong.

 

The following Tissandier formula has afforded excellent results. Its facility of preparation and its low cost are among its advantages. Mix 10 parts of coal tar, 1 to 1.6 parts of slaked lime, 4,000 parts of oil of turpentine, and 400 parts of strong vinegar, in which 1/5 part of cupric sulphate has been previously boiled. The addition of 2 or 3 cloves of garlic in the solution of cupric sulphate aids in producing a varnish, brilliant as well as permanent. The compound can be colored like ordinary paints.

 

XXIV. Rectified rosinous oil for painting must not be confounded with oils used in the preparation of lubricants for metallic surfaces exposed to friction. It contains a certain quantity of rosin in solution, which, on drying, fills the pores of the wood completely, and prevents decomposition from the action of various saprophytic fungi. It is well adapted to the preservation of pieces to be buried in the ground or exposed to the inclemency

 


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of the weather. Paints can also be prepared with it by the addition of coloring powders, yellow, brown, red, green, blue, etc., in the proportion of 1 kilo to 5 liters of oil. The addition ought to take place slowly, while shaking, in order to obtain quite a homogeneous mixture. Paints of this kind are economical, in consequence of the low price of rosin, but they cannot be used in the interior of dwellings by reason of the strong and disagreeable odor disengaged, even a long time after their application. As an offset, they can be used like tar and carbonyl, for stalls, stables, etc.

 

To Prevent Warping. Immerse the wood to be worked upon in a concentrated solution of sea salt for a week or so. The wood thus prepared, after having been worked upon, will resist all changes of temperature.

 

STAINS FOR WOOD.

 

In the staining of wood it is not enough to know merely how to prepare and how to apply the various staining solutions; a rational exercise of the art of wood staining demands rather a certain acquaintance with the varieties of wood to be operated upon, a knowledge of their separate relations to the individual stains themselves; for with one and the same stain very different effects are obtained when applied to the varying species of wood.

 

Such a diversity of effects arises from the varying chemical composition of wood. No unimportant role is played by the presence in greater or lesser quantities of tannin, which acts chemically upon many of the stains and forms with them various colored varnishes in the fibers. Two examples will suffice to make this clear. (1) Let us take pine or fir, in which but little of the tanning principle is found, and stain it with a solution of 50 parts of potassium chromate in 1,000 parts of pure water; the result will be a plain pale yellow color, corresponding with the potassium chromate, which is not fast and as a consequence is of no value. If, with the same solution, on the contrary, we stain oak, in which the tanning principle is very abundant, we obtain a beautiful yellowish-brown color which is capable of withstanding the effects of both light and air for some time; for the tannin of the oak combines with the penetrating potassium chromate to form a brown dyestuff which deposits in the woody cells. A similar procedure occurs in the staining of mahogany and walnut with the chromate because these varieties of wood are very rich in tannin.

 

(2) Take some of the same pine or fir and stain it with a solution of 20 parts of sulphate of iron in 1,000 parts of water and there will be no perceptible color. Apply this stain, however, to the oak and we get a beautiful light gray, and if the stain be painted with a brush on the smoother oaken board, in a short time a strong bluish-gray tint will appear. This effect of the stain is the result of the combination of the green vitriol with the tannin; the more tannin present, the darker the stain becomes. The hardness or density of the wood, too, exerts a marked influence upon the resulting stain. In a soft wood, having large pores, the stain not only sinks further in, but much more of it is required than in a hard dense wood; hence in the first place a stronger, greasier stain will be obtained with the same solution than in the latter.

 

From this we learn that in soft woods it is more advisable to use a thinner stain to arrive at a certain tone; while the solution may be made thicker or stronger for hard woods.

 

The same formula or the same staining solution cannot be relied upon to give the same results at all times even when applied to the same kinds of wood. A greater or lesser amount of rosin or sap in the wood at the time the tree is felled, will offer more or less resistance to the permeating tendencies of the stain, so that the color may be at one time much lighter, at another darker. Much after the same manner we find that the amount of the tanning principle is not always equal in the same species of wood.

 

Here much depends upon the age of the tree as well as upon the climatic conditions surrounding the place where it grew. Moreover, the fundamental color of the wood itself may vary greatly in examples of the same species and thus, particularly in light, delicate shades, cause an important delay in the realization of the final color tone. Because of this diversification, not only in the different species of wood, but even in separate specimens of the same species, it is almost impossible always, and at the first attempt, to match a certain predetermined color.

 

It is desirable that trials at staining should first be made upon pieces of board from the same wood as the object to be stained; the results of such experiments furnishing exact data concerning the strength and composition of the stain to be employed for the exact reproduction of a prescribed color.

 


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Many cases occur in which the color tone obtained by staining cannot always be judged directly after applying the stain. Especially is this the case when stain is employed which slowly develops under the action of the air or when the dyestuff penetrates only slowly into the pores of the wood. In such cases the effect of the staining may only be fully and completely appreciated after the lapse of 24 or 48 hours.

 

Wood that has been stained should always be allowed 24 or 48 hours to dry in ordinary temperatures, before a coat of varnish, polish, or wax is applied. If any dampness be left in the wood this will make itself apparent upon the varnish or polish. It will become dull, lose its glossy appearance, and exhibit white spots which can only be removed with difficulty. If a certain effect demand the application of two or more stains one upon the other, this may only be done by affording each distinct coat time to dry, which requires at least 24 hours.

 

Not all the dyes, which are applicable to wood staining, can be profitably used together, either when separately applied or mixed. This injunction is to be carefully noted in the application of coal tar or aniline colors.

 

Among the aniline dyes suitable for staining woods are two groups the so-called acid dyes and the basic dyes. If a solution of an acid dye be mixed with a basic dye the effect of their antagonistic dispositions is shown in the clouding up of the stain, a fine precipitate is visible and often a rosin-like separation is noticeable.

 

It is needless to say that such a staining solution is useless for any practical purpose. It cannot penetrate the wood fibers and would present but an unseemly and for the most part a flaky appearance. In preparing the stains it is therefore of the greatest importance that they remain lastingly clear. It would be considerably of advantage, before mixing aniline solutions of which the acid or basic characteristics are unknown, to make a test on a small scale in a champagne glass and after standing a short time carefully examine the solution. If it has become cloudy or wanting in transparency it is a sign that a separation of the coloring matter has taken place.

 

The mixing of acid or basic dyestuffs even in dry powdered form is attended with the same disadvantages as in the state of solubility, for just as soon as they are dissolved in water the reactions commence and the natural process of precipitation takes place with all its attending disagreeable consequences.

 

COLOR STAINS:

 

Bronze.

 

I.    Prepare first a thin glue size by soaking good animal glue over night in cold water and melting it next morning in the usual water bath. Strain it, before using, through old linen or cheese cloth into a clean vessel. Sandpaper smooth and dust the articles, then apply with a soft bristle brush 2 or 3 coats of the size, allowing sufficient time for each coat to harden before applying the next. Now, a ground coat made by thoroughly mixing finely bolted gilders' whiting and glue size is applied, and when this has become hard it is rubbed to a smooth, even surface with selected fine pumice, and then given 1 coat of thin copal varnish. When this is nearly but not quite dry, the bronze powder is applied with a suitable brush or wad of cotton, and when dry the surplus bronze is removed with the same tool. If collected on clean paper, the dusted-off bronze powder may be used again.

 

II.   Diluted water-glass solution makes a good ground for bronze.

Bronze powder is sprinkled on from a wide-necked glass tied up with gauze, and the excess removed by gently knocking. The bronze powder adheres so firmly after drying that a polish may be put on by means of an agate. The process is especially useful for repairing worn-off picture frames, book ornamentations, etc. The following bronze ground also yields good results: Boil 11,000 parts of linseed oil with 25 parts of impure zinc carbonate, 100 parts of red lead, 25 parts of litharge, and 0.3 parts of mercuric chloride, until a drop taken out will stand like a pea upon a glass surface. Before complete cooling, the mass is diluted with oil of turpentine to a thick syrup.

 

Ebony Stains.

I.    To 1 pint of boiling water add 3/4 ounce of copperas and 1 ounce logwood chips. Apply this to the wood hot. When the surface has dried thoroughly wet it with a solution composed of 7 ounces steel filings dissolved in 1/4 pint of vinegar.

 

II.   Give the wood several applications of a stout decoction of logwood chips, finishing off with a free smear of vinegar in which rusty nails have been for some time submerged.

 

III.  In 1 quart of water boil 1/4 pound of logwood chips, subsequently adding 1/2 ounce pearl ash, applying the mixture

 


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hot. Then again boil the same quantity of logwood in the same quantity of water, adding 1/4 ounce of verdigris and 1/4 ounce of copperas, after which strain and put in 1/4 pound of rusty steel filings. With this latter mixture coat the work, and, should the wood not be sufficiently black, repeat the application.

 

Metallic Luster. A valuable process to impart the luster of metal to ordinary wood, without injuring its natural qualities, is as follows: The wood is laid, according to its weight, for 3 or 4 days in a caustic alkaline solution, such as, for instance, of calcined soda, at a temperature of 170º F. Then it is at once placed in a bath of calcium hydrosulphite, to which, after 24 to 36 hours, a saturated solution of sulphur in caustic potash is added. In this mixture the wood is left for 48 hours at 100º to 120º F. The wood thus prepared, after having been dried at a moderate temperature, is polished by means of a smoothing iron, and the surface assumes a very handsome metallic luster. The effect of this metallic gloss is still more pleasing if the wood is rubbed with a piece of lead, zinc, or tin. If it is subsequently polished with a burnisher of glass of porcelain, the wood gains the brilliancy of a metallic mirror.

 

Nutwood. One part permanganate of potassium is dissolved in 30 parts clear water; with this the wood to be stained is coated twice. After an action of 5 minutes, rinse off with water, dry, oil, and polish. It is best to prepare a fresh solution each time.

 

Oak.

 

I.    Water-color stains do not penetrate deep enough into wood to make the effect strong enough, hence solutions of other material than color are being employed for the purpose. Aqua ammonia alone, applied with a rag or brush repeatedly, will darken the color of oak to a weathered effect, but it is not very desirable, because of its tendency to raise the grain. Bichromate of potash, dissolved in cold water, applied in a like manner, until the desired depth is obtained, will serve the purpose. These washes or solutions, however, do not give the dark, almost black, effect that is at the present time expected for weathered oak, and in order to produce this, 4 ounces of logwood chips and 3 ounces of green copperas should be boiled together in 2 quarts of water for 40 minutes and the solution applied hot. When this has dried it should be gone over with a wash made from 4 ounces steel filings and 1 pint of strong vinegar. The steel filings are previously put into the vinegar and allowed to stand for several days. This will penetrate into the wood deeply, and the stain will be permanent. Picture-frame manufacturers use a quick-drying stain, made from aniline blacks.

 

II.   Dissolve 1/4 part of permanganate of potassium in 1,000 parts of cold water and paint the wood with the violet solution obtained. As soon as the solution comes in contact with the wood it decomposes in consequence of chemical action, and a handsome light-brown precipitate is produced in the wood. The brushes used must be washed out immediately, as the permanganate of potassium destroys animal bristles, but it is preferable to use sponges or brushes of glass threads for staining. Boil 2 parts of cutch in 6 parts of water for 1 hour, stir while boiling, so that the rosiniferous catechu cannot burn on the bottom of the vessel; strain the liquid as soon as the cutch is dissolved, through linen, and bring again to a boil. Now dissolve therein part of alum, free from iron; apply the stain while hot, and cover after the drying, with a solution of 1 part of bichromate of potassium in 25 parts of water.

 

Rosewoood. First procure 1/2 pound logwood, boiling it in 3 pints water. Continue the boiling until the liquid assumes a very dark color, at which point add 1 ounce salt of tartar. When at the boiling point stain your wood with 2 or 3 coats, but not in quick succession, as the latest coat must be nearly dry before the succeeding one is applied.

The use of a fiat graining brush, deftly handled, will produce a very excellent imitation of dark rosewood.

 

Silver Gray. This stain is prepared by dissolving 1 part of pyrogallic acid in 25 parts of warm water and the wood is coated with this. Allow this coating to dry and prepare, meanwhile, a solution of 2 parts of green vitriol in 50 parts of boiling water, with which the first coat-

ing is covered again to obtain the silver-gray shade.

 

Walnut.

 

I.    Prepare a solution of 6 ounces of a solution of permanganate of potassium, and 6 ounces of sulphate of magnesia in 2 quarts of hot water. The solution is applied on the wood with a brush and the application should be repeated once. In contact with the wood the permanganate decomposes, and a handsome, lasting walnut color results.

If small pieces of wood are to be thus stained, a very dilute bath is prepared

 


[784]

 

WOOD

 

according to the above description, then the wooden pieces are immersed and left therein from 1 to 5 minutes, according to whether a lighter or darker coloring is desired.

 

II.   One hundredweight Vandyke brown, ground fine in water, and 28 pounds of soda, dissolved in hot water, are mixed while the solutions are hot in a revolving mixer. The mixture is then dried in sheet-iron trays.

 

Yellow. The wood is coated with a hot concentrated solution of picric acid, dried, and polished. (Picric acid is poisonous.)

 

IMITATION STAINS.

 

Yellow, green, blue, or gray staining on wood can be easily imitated with a little glazing color in oil or vinegar, which will prove better and more permanent than the staining. If the pores of the wood are opened by a lye or a salt, almost any diluted color can be worked into it. With most stains the surface is thus prepared previously.

 

Light-Fast Stains. Stains fast to light are obtained by saturating wood in a vacuum chamber, first with dilute sulphuric acid, then with dilute alkali to neutralize the acid, and finally with a solution with or without the addition of a mordant. The action of the acid is to increase the affinity of the wood for dye very materially. As wood consists largely of cellulose, mercerization, which always increases the affinity of that substance for dyes, may be caused to some extent by the acid.

 

SPIRIT STAINS:

 

Black.

 

I.   

White shellac                       12 ounces

Vegetable black                     6 ounces

Methylated spirit                   3 pints

 

II.  

Lampblack                           1 pound

Ground iron scale                   5 pounds

Vinegar                             1 gallon

 

Mahogany Brown. Put into a vessel, say 4 pounds of bichromate of potash, and as many ounces of burnt umber, let it stand a day or two, then strain or lawn for use.

 

Vandyke Brown.

 

Spirit of wine                      2 pints

Burnt umber                         3 ounces

Vandyke brown color                 1 ounce

Carbonate of soda                   1 ounce

Potash                              1/2 ounce

 

Mahogany. Rub the wood with a solution of nitrous acid, and then apply with a brush the following:

 

I.   

Dragon's blood                      1 ounce

Sodium carbonate                    6 drachms

Alcohol                             20 ounces

 

Filter just before use.

 

II.   Rub the wood with a solution of potassium carbonate, 1 drachm to a pint of water, and then apply a dye made by boiling together:

 

Madder                              2 ounces

Logwood chips                       1/2 ounce

Water                               1 quart

 

Maple.

 

I.   

Pale button lac                     3 pounds

Bismarck brown                      1/8 ounce

Vandyke brown                       1/2  ounce

Gamboge                             4 ounces

Methylated spirit                   1 gallon

 

II.   Use 1 gallon of methylated spirit, 4 ounces gamboge (powdered), 1/2 ounce Vandyke brown, 1 drachm Bismarck brown, 3 pounds shellac.

 

Maroon. To produce a rich maroon or ruby, steep red Janders wood in rectified naphtha and stir into the solution a little cochineal; strain or lawn for use.

 

Turpentine Stains. Turpentine stains are chiefly solutions of oil-soluble coal-tar dyes in turpentine oil, with small quantities of wax also in solution. They do not roughen the wood, making a final polishing unnecessary. They enter the wood slowly, so that an even stain, especially on large surfaces, is secured. The disadvantages of turpentine stains are the lack of permanence of the coloring, when exposed to light and air, and their high price.

 

Varnish Stains. Shellac is the chief article forming the basis of varnish stains the coloring matter being usually coal tar or aniline dyes, as they give better results than dye wood tincture. To prevent the varnish stain being too brittle, the addition of elemi rosin is a much better one than common rosin, as the latter retards the drying quality, and if too much be used, renders the stain sticky.

 

Water Stains. Water stains are solutions of chemicals, dye extracts, astringent substances, and coal-tar dyes in water. They roughen the wood, a disadvantage, however, which can be remedied to a large extent by previous treatment, as follows: The wood is moistened with a wet sponge, allowed to dry,

 


[785]

 

WOOD

 

and then rubbed with sandpaper, or made smooth by other agencies. This almost entirely prevents roughening of the surface by the stain. Another disadvantage of these stains is that they are rapidly absorbed by the wood, which makes an even staining of large surfaces difficult. For this too there is a remedy. The surface of the wood is rubbed all over evenly with raw linseed oil, applied with a woolen cloth, allowed to dry, and then thoroughly smoothed with sandpaper. The water stain, applied with a sponge, now spreads evenly, and is but slightly absorbed by the wood.

 

Among good water stains are the long-known Cassel brown and nut brown, in granules. Catechine is recommended for brown shades, with tannin or pyrogallic acid and green vitriol for gray. For bright-colored stains the tar-dyes azine green, croceine scarlet, Parisian red, tartrazine, water-soluble nigrosin, walnut, and oak brown are very suitable. With proper mixing of these dyes, all colors except blue and violet can be produced, and prove very fast to light and air, and superior to turpentine stains. Only the blue and violet dyes, methyl blue, naphthol blue, and pure violet, do not come up to the standard, and require a second staining with tannin.

 

A very simple method of preparing water stains is as follows: Solutions are made of the dyes most used, by dissolving 500 parts of the dye in 10,000 parts of hot water, and these are kept in bottles or casks. Any desired stain can be prepared by mixing proper quantities of the solutions, which can be diluted with water to make lighter stains.

 

Stains for Wood Attacked by Alkalies or Acids.

 

Solution A

 

Copper sulphate                     125 grams

Potassium chlorate                  125 grams

Water                               1,000 cu. cm.

 

Boil until all is dissolved.

 

Solution B

 

Aniline hydrochloride               150 grams

Water                               1,000 cu. cm.

 

Apply Solution A twice by means of a brush, allowing time to dry after each coat; next, put on Solution B and let dry again. On the day following, rub on a little oil with a cloth and repeat this once a month.

 

SUBSTITUTES FOR WOOD.

 

I.    Acetic paraldehyde or acetic aldehyde respectively, or polymerized formaldehyde is mixed with methylic alcohol and carbolic acid, as well as fusel oil saturated with hydrochloric acid gas or sulphuric acid gas or methylic alcohol, respectively, are added to the mixture.

The mass thus obtained is treated with paraffine. The final product is useful as a substitute for ebonite and wood as well as for insulating purposes.

 

II.   "Carton Pierre" is the name of a mass which is used as a substitute for carved wood. It is prepared in the following manner: Glue is dissolved and boiled; to this, tissue paper in suitable quantity is added, which will readily go to pieces. Then linseed oil is added, and finally chalk is stirred in. The hot mass forms a thick dough which crumbles in the cold, but softens between the fingers and becomes kneadable, so that it can be pressed into molds (of glue, gypsum, and sulphur). After a few days the mass will become dry and almost as

hard as stone. The paper imparts to it a high degree of firmness, and it is less apt to be injured than wood. It binds well and readily adheres to wood.

 

III.  Wood Pulp. The boards for painters' utensils are manufactured in the following manner: The ordinary wood fiber (not the chemical wood cellulose) is well mixed with soluble glass of 33º Bé., then spread like cake upon an even surface, and beaten or rolled until smooth. Before completely dry, the cake is removed, faintly satined (for various other purposes it is embossed) and finally dried thoroughly at a temperature of about 133º F., whereupon the mass may be sawed, carved, polished, etc., like wood.

 

Any desired wood color can be obtained by the admixture of the corresponding, pulverized pigment to the mass. The wood veining is produced by placing a board of the species of timber to be imitated, in vinegar, which causes the soft parts of the wood to deepen, and making an impression with the original board thus treated upon the wood pulp when the latter is not quite hard. By means of one of these original boards (with the veins embossed), impressions can be made upon a large number of artificial wood plates. The veins will show to a greater advantage if the artificial wood is subsequently saturated and treated with colored oil, colored stain and colored polish, as is done with palettes.

 

WOOD, ACID-PROOF:

See Acid-Proofing.

 

WOOD CEMENTS:

See Adhesives,

 


[786]

 

WRITING - YEAST

 

WOOD, CHLORINE-PROOFING:

See Acid-Proofing.

 

WOOD, FIREPROOFING:

See Fireproofing.

 

WOOD GILDING:

See Plating.

 

WOOD, IMITATION:

See Plaster.

 

WOOD POLISHES:

See Polishes.

 

WOOD RENOVATORS:

See Cleaning Preparations and Methods under Paint, Varnish, and Enamel Removers.

 

WOOD, SECURING METALS TO:

See Adhesives.

 

WOOD, WATERPROOFING:

See Waterproofing.

 

WOOD'S METAL:

See Alloys.

 

WOOL FAT:

See Fats.

 

WORM POWDER FOR STOCK:

See Veterinary Formulas.

 

WRITING, RESTORING FADED:

 

Writing on old manuscripts, parchments, and old letters that has faded into nearly or complete invisibility can be restored by rubbing over it a solution of ammonium sulphide, hydrogen sulphide or of "liver of sulphur." On parchment the restored color is fairly permanent but on paper it does not last long. The letters however could be easily retraced, after such treatment, by the use of India ink and thus made permanent. This treatment will not restore faded aniline ink. It only works with ink containing a metal-like iron that forms a black sulphide.

 

WRINKLES, REMOVAL OF:

See Cosmetics.

 

Yeast

 

DRY YEAST.

 

Boil together for 1/2 hour, 95 parts of the finest, grated hops and 4,000 parts of water. Strain. Add to the warm liquor 1,750 parts of rye meal or flour. When the temperature has fallen to that of the room add 167 parts of good yeast. On the following day the mass will be in a state of fermentation. While it is in this condition add 4,000 parts of barley flour, so as to form a dough. This dough is cut up into thin disks, which are dried as rapidly as possible in the open air or sun. For use, the disks are broken into small pieces and soaked overnight in warm water. The yeast can be used on the following day as if it were ordinary brewers' yeast.

 

PRESERVATION OF YEAST.

 

I.    The yeast is laid in a vessel of cold water which is thereupon placed in a well-ventilated, cool spot. In this manner the yeast can be preserved for several weeks. In order to preserve the yeast for several months a different process must be followed. The yeast, after having been pressed, is thoroughly dried. For this purpose the yeast is cut up into small pieces which are rolled out, placed on blotting paper, and allowed to dry in a place which is not reached by the sun. These rolls are then grated, again dried, and finally placed in glass bottles. For use, the yeast is dissolved, whereupon it immediately regains its freshness. This process is particularly to be recommended because it preserves the yeast for a long period.

 

II.   For liquid yeast add one-eighth of its volume in glycerine. In the case of compressed yeast, the cakes are to be covered with glycerine and kept in closed vessels. Another method of preserving compressed yeast is to mix it intimately with animal charcoal to a dough, which is to be dried by exposure to sunlight. When it is to be used, it is treated with water, which will take up the ferment matter, while the charcoal will be deposited. Liquid and compressed yeast have been kept for a considerable time, without alteration, by saturating the former with chloroform and keeping the latter under chloroform water.

 

YEAST TESTS.

 

I.    Pour a few drops of yeast into boiling water. If the yeast sinks, it is spoiled; if it floats, it is good.

 

II.   To 1 pound yeast add 1/2 tablespoonful of corn whisky or brandy, a pinch of sugar, and 2 tablespoonfuls of wheat flour. Mix thoroughly and allow the resultant compound to stand in a warm place. If the yeast is good it will rise in about an hour.

 

YEAST AND FERTILIZERS:

See Fertilizers.

 

YELLOW (CHROME), TEST FOR:

See Pigments.

 


[787]

 

INDEX

 

[A]

Absinthe, 765

Absolute Alcohol, 45

Abrasion Remedy, 225, 486

Acacia, Mucilage of, 43

Acid-free Soldering Fluid, 659

Acid-proof Alloy, 62

      Cement, 26

      Corks, 10

      Glass, 374

Acid-proofing, 9

Acid-proof Pastes, 38

      Putty, 607

      Table Top, 9

Acid Receptacles, Lining for, 10

Acid-resisting Paint, 499

Acids, Soldering, 656

Acid Stains Removed, 184

      Test for Gold, 432

for Vinegar, 358

Aconite-Monkshood Poison, 93

Adhesion, 105

      Belt Pastes for Increasing, 105

Adhesive Paste, 37, 39

Adhesives, 10

Advertising Matter, to Scent, 510

Adulterants in Foods, 348

Adulteration of Linseed Oil, 460

of Wax, 753

Adurol Developer, 527

Affixing Labels to Glass, 42

Agar Agar Paste, 37

Agate, Buttons of Artificial, 44

Agate (Imitation), 370

Age of Eggs, 283

Aging of Silk, 639

Agricultural Sources of Industrial Alcohol, 668

Air Bath, 44

Bubbles in Gelatine, 370

      Exclusion of, 553

Air-purifying, 44

Albata Metal, 63

Albumen, 34

      in Urine, Detection of, 44

      Paste, 37

Alcohol, 44

      Absolute, 45

      Defined, 667

      Deodorized, 45, 514

      Dilution of, 45, 703

      in Beer, 45

      Manufacture, 667, 674

      Solid, 45

      Tests for Absolute, 45

Ale, 46

      Ginger, 107

Alfenide Metal, 63

Alkali Blue and Nicholson's Blue Dye, 267

Alkalis and Their Salts Poison, 93

Alkaline Glycerine of Thymol, 100

Alkaloids, Antidotes to, 102

Alkermes Cordial, 763

Alloy, Acid-proof, 62

      for Caliper and Gage-rod Castings, 80

      for Watch Pinion Sockets, 736

      Lipowitz's, 61

      Moussets', 76

Alloys, 47

      Copper, Silver, Cadmium, 76

for Casting Coins, etc., 62

for Cementing Glass, 52

for Drawing Colors on Steel, 80

for Metal Foil, 474

for Small Casting Molds, 80

having a Density, 48

Silver, Nickel, Zinc, 76

Tin, 77

      Unclassified, 80

Almond Blossom Perfumery, 518

Cold Cream, 235

Extracts, 312

      Powders for the Toilet, 242

Altars, to Clean, 185

Alum, 80

      Baking Powder, 102

Bath, 535

      Process of Water Purification, 340

Aluminum Alloys, 48

      Electrical Conductivity of, 50

Aluminum-brass, 50

Aluminum Bronze, 56, 657

      Castings, 150

Aluminum-Copper, 50

Aluminum Gilding, 576

Gold, 68

Etching Fluid for, 324

How to Color, 80

Lacquer for, 438

Paper, 507

Plating, 572, 581

Polishes, 590

Aluminum-Silver, 50, 75

Aluminum Solders, 657

Aluminum-Tin, 50

Aluminum, to Clean, 204

      Toughness, Density and Tenacity, 83

Aluminum-Tungsten, 50

Aluminum Varnish, 725

Working of Sheet, 83

Aluminum-Zinc, 50

Amalgam for Cementing Glass, etc., 90

for Plaster, 65

      for Silvering Glass Balls, 90

for the Rubber of Electric Machines, 90

Gold Plating, 576

Amalgams, 64, 85

for Mirrors, 72

Amber, 90

Cements, 26

Varnish, 718

Ambrosia Powder, 628

American Champagne, 118

Factory Cheese, 176

Lemonade, 110

Soda Fountain Company's Whipped Cream, 248

Amethyst (Imitation), 370

Amidol Developer, 528

Ammon-carbonite, 331

Ammonia, 91

      for Fixing Prints, 536

Household, 91

Poison, 93

Violet Color for, 91

Water, 245, 519

Perfumed, 91

Anchovies, Essence of, 98

Anchovy Paste, 98

      Preparations, 98

      Sauce, Extemporaneous, 98

Angostura Bitters, 762

Anise Cordial, 763

Aniline, 266

      Black Dye, 266, 279

Substitutes, 279

      Black Lake Dye, 278

      Blue Dye, 268

      Green Dye for Wool, 269

for Silk, 269

      in Pigments, Tests for, 560

      Scarlet Dye, 271

      Stains, to Remove, 185

      Yellow Dye, 271

Animals, Fly Protection for, 419

Ankara, 142

Annealing Bronze, 56

      Copper, 219

Annealing of Steel, Wire, etc., 681

Anodynes, 486

Ansco Platinum Paper, 529

Ant Destroyers, 420

Anti-corrosive or Asiatic Ink, 414

Antidotes for Belladonna, 93

      for Poisons, 92

Anti-ferments, 97

Anti-fouling Compositions, 498

Anti-freezing Solution, 362, 363

      for Automobilists, 363

Anti-friction Bearing or Babbitt Metals, 50

      Metal, 58

Anti-frost Solution, 363

Anti-leak Rubber Tire, 708

Antimony Poison, 93

      Baths, 581

Antique Bronzes, 566

      Silver, 587, 639

      Imitation of, 640

Antiques, to Preserve, 98

Anti-rust Compositions, 625

      Paper for Needles, 625

      Pastes, 625

Antiseptic Bromine Solution, 100

      Enamel, 720

      Nervine Ointment, 487

      Oil of Cinnamon, 100

      Paste (Poison), 99

      Pencils, 99

      Powders, 98

      Soap, 644

      Solution, Coloring for, 100

      Tooth Powder, 253

Antiseptics, 98

      for Caged Birds, 729

      Mouth, 99

Aphtite, 70

Apollinaris Lemonade, 110

      Water, 740

Apple Extract, 312

      Syrup, 312

Applications for Prickly Heat, 398

      of Barium Amalgams, 86

      of Bismuth Amalgams, 88

      of Cadmium Amalgams, 87

      of Copper Amalgams, 87

      of Gold Amalgams, 89

      of Lead Amalgams, 88

      of Manganese Amalgams, 87

 


[788]

 

INDEX

 

Applications of Potassium Amalgams, 86

      of Silver Amalgams, 88

of Sodium Amalgams, 86

of Strontium Amalgams, 86

of Tin Amalgams, 87

of Zinc Amalgams, 87

Applying Decalcomania Pictures,

Apricot Extract, 312

Aquarium Putty, 608

Argentan, 69

Arguzoid, 70

Armenian Cement, 20

Arms, Oil for, 460

Arnica Salve, 486

Aromatic Cod-Liver Oil, 482

      Cotton, 246

      Rhubarb Remedy, 180

      Vinegar, 735

Arsenic Alloys, 63, 75

Arsenic Poison, 93, 614

Art Bronzes, 57, 556

      of Lacquering, 437

Artificial Aging of Fabrics, 639

      Beeswax, 754

      Butter, 142

      Ciders, 181

      Coloring of Flowers, 346

      Egg Oil, 284

      Fertilizers for Pot Plants, 336

      Flowers, Dyes for, 272

      Flower Fertilizer, 337

      Horn, 396

      Leather, 447

      Marbles, 699

      Rubber, 618

      "Rubbered" Silk, 639

      Slate, 643

      Violet Perfumery, 518

      Water, 739

Asbestos Cement, 30

Fabric, 342

Asphalt and Pitch, 33

      as Ingredient of Rubber, 619

      in Painting, 718

      Varnishes, 718

Assaying of Gold, 381

Asthma Cures, 101

      Fumigating Powders, 101

      in Canaries, 728

      Papers, 101

Astringent for Horses, 730

      Wash for Flabby Skin, 234

Atomic Weights, 758

Atomizer Liquid for Sick Rooms, 264

Attaching Enamel Letters to Glass, 19

      by Cement, 17

Atropine, Antidote to, 102

Aqua Aromatica, 102

      Fortis for the Touchstone, 383

Poison, 92

      Regia, 102

Aquarium Cements, 31

Automobile Engines, Cooling, 363

Automobiles, Anti-freezing Solution, 363

Axle Grease, 462

 

[B]

Babbitt-Metals, 50

Baking Powders, 102

Balance Spring, 738

Baldness, 392

Balkan Paste, 38

Ball Blue, 281, 444

Ball-Room Floor Powder, 345

Balsam, Birch, 103

      of Sulphur, 380

      Spray Solution, 103

Balsam, Stains, to Remove, 194

      Wild-cherry, 103

Balsams, 102

Balsamic Cough Syrup, 211

Banana Bronzing Solution, 489

      Cream, 115

      Trick, the Burning, 611

      Syrup, 312

Banjo Sour, 110

Barbers' Itch, 486

      Powder, 243

Barium Amalgams, 86

      Poison, 615

Barometers (Paper), 402

Bath, Air, 44

      Metal, 63

      Powder, 242

      Tablets, Effervescent, 103

Bath-tub Enamel, 721

      Paint, 501

Batteries, Solution for, 104

Basis for Effervescent Salts, 627

Baudoin Metal, 63

Bavaroise au Cognac, 118

Bay Rum, 104, 513

Bear Fat, 333

Bearing Lubricant, 461

      Metal, 50

Beauty Cream, 231

      Water, 244

Bedbug Destroyers, 420

Beechwood Furniture Polish, 593

Beef and Iron, 771

      Iron, and Wine, 104

Beef-marrow Pomade, 227

Beef Peptomoids, 509

      Preservatives, 360

      Tea, 112

Beer, 118

      Ginger, 108

      Lemon, 108

      Restoration of Spoiled, 105

      Spruce, 119

      Treacle, 119

      Weiss, 119

Beers, Alcohol in, 45

Beetle Powder, 425

Bees, Foul Brood in, 105

Beeswax, Artificial, 754

Belladonna, Antidotes to, 93

Bell Metal, 51

Belt Cement, 31

      Glue, 15

      Lubricant, 462

      Pastes for Increasing Adhesion, 105

Bénédictine, 769

Bengal Lights, 609

Bent Glass, 371

Benzine, 106

      Cleaning with, 209

      Purification of, 106

      to Color Green, 106

Benzoic Acid, Detection of, 350

      in Food, 350

Benzoic-acid Pastilles, 211

Benzoin-Glycerine Soap, 652

Benzoparal, 107

Berge's Blasting Powder, 330

Beverages, 107

      Yellow Coloring for, 119

Bibra Alloy, 71

Bicycle Dipping Varnish, 719

Bicycle-tire Cement, 23

Bicycle Varnishes, 719

Bicycles, Black Paint for, 495

Bidery Metal, 80

Billiard Balls, 148, 428

Birch Balsam, 103

Birch-Bud Water, 519

Birch Water, 244, 389

Bird Diseases, Remedies, 728

 

Foods, 120, 729

Bird Lime, 458 k

      Paste, 145

      Tonic, 729

Birds, Antiseptic Wash for, 729

      Constipation in, 729

      Diarrhoea in, 729

Biscuit, Dog, 265

Bismarck Brown Dye, 267

Bismuth, 49

      Alloys, 52

      Amalgams, Applications of, 88

Bronze, 70

      Purification of, 380

      to Purify, 380

Biting Off Red-hot Iron, 612

Bitter Almond Oil Poison, 93

Bitters, 762

Blackberry Cholera Mixture, 180

      Cordial, 763

Blackboard Paint and Varnish, 489

      Varnish, 720

Black Color on Brass, 129

      Dye for Tanned Leather, 447

on Cotton, 266

on Wool, for Mixtures, 267

Blackening Iron, 495

"Black Eye" Lotion, 333

Black Finish for Brass, 129

      Grease Paints, 229

      Hair Dye without Silver, 390

Blackhead Remedies, 232

Blacking Copper, 221

      for Harness, 450

      for Shoes, 631

      Stove, 700

Black Japanese Varnish, 719

      Lake Dyes for Wall-paper, 278

      Marble, Imitation, 699

      Marking Inks, 407

      Paint for Polished Iron, 495

      Patina, 585

      Putty, 607

      Ruling Ink, 403

      Sheet Rust Preventive, 624

      Starch, 680

      Straw Hat Varnish, 266

      Varnish, 543, 544, 719

      Wash for Casting Molds, 150

Blanching Silver, 640

Blanket Washing, 399

Blasting Powder, 330

Blazing Sponge Trick, 611

Bleach for Hands, 233

Bleaches, Bone, 430

Bleaching, 120

 

and Coloring Feathers, 335

Bone Fat, 333

Cotton by Steaming, 245

      Cotton, 245

      Feathers, 121, 335

      Linen, 120

      of Linseed Oil, 459

      of Vegetable Fibers with Hydrogen Peroxide, 245

      Oils, 484

      Photographic Prints White, 553

      Silk, 120, 639

      Skin Salves, 234

      Solution, 121

      for Photographs, 553

      Solutions for the Laundry, 446

      Sponges, 678

      Straw, 120

      Tallows and Fats, 334

      Wool, 120

Bleeding, Local, 701

Blight Remedies, 121

Blisters, for Horses, 729

Block for Soldering, 667

      Hollow Concrete Building, 691

      Machines, 694

Blocks Poured from Wet Concrete, 694

B[l]ood-red Brick Stain, 166

 


[789]

 

INDEX

 

Blotting Paper, 503

Blue, Ball, 281

Blue-black Ink, 414

      Patina, 585

Blue Bronze, 138

      Dye for Hosiery, 268

      from Green at Night, 121

      Indelible Ink, 406

      Paving Bricks, 166

Blueprint Inks, 403

      Paper Making, 536

Blueprints, to Change, 121

      to Turn Brown, 542

      Waterproofing, 741

Blue Ruling Ink, 403

      Sanitary Powder, 263

      Vitriol Poison, 94

Bluing, 443

      Compounds, 443

      of Steel, 682

Bluish-black Lake Dye, 278

Blush Pink Dye on Cotton Textile, 279

      Board-sizing, 38

Boiled Oil, 484

Boiler Compounds, 121

      Plates, Protecting from Scales, 122

      Pressure, 123

      Scales, Prevention of, 122

Boiling the Linseed Oil, 409

Boil Remedy, 121

Bone Black, 123

      Bleaches, 430

      Fat, 333

      Fertilizers, 338

      or Ivory Black, 123

      Polishes, 395

      Uniting Glass With, 17

Bones, A Test for Broken, 124

      Treatment of, in Manufacturing Glue, 10

Bookbinders' Varnish, 720

Book Disinfectant, 263

      How to Open, 125

Bookworms, 425

Books, their Preservation, 124

      to Remove Marks from, 186

Boot Dressings, 631

      Lubricant, 460

Boot-top Liquid, 632

Boots, Waterproofing, 750

Borated Apple Blossom Powder, 243

      Talcum, 510

Borax in Food, 350

      for Sprinkling, 125

      Soap Powder, 650

Boric Acid, Detection of, 350

Borotonic, 258

Bottling Sweet Cider, 181

Bottle-cap Lacquer, 440

Bottle-Capping Mixtures, 126

Bottle Cleaners, 210

      Deodorizer, 127

      Stoppers, 700

      Varnish, 720

      Wax, 553

Bottles, 126

      White Glass for, 373

Bouillon, 113

      Chicken, 112

      Clam, 113

      Hot Egg, 112

      Tomato Extract, 212

Bowls of Fire Trick, 611

Box Glue, 15

Bradley Platinum Paper, 529

"Braga," 117

Bran, Sawdust in, 126

Brandy, Artificial French, 768

      and Brandy Bitters, 762

Brass, 127, 435

      A Bronze for, 136

Brass and Bronze Protective Paint, 495

      Articles, Restoration of, 132

      Black Color on, 129

      Black Finish for, 129

      Bronzing, 566

      Brown Color to, 130

      Cleaners, 202, 203

      Coloring, 129, 473

      Colors for Polished, 127

      Etching Bath for, 324

Fluid for, 323

      Fastening Porcelain to, 17

      Gilding, 576

      Graining of, 130

Brass-Iron (Aich's Metal), 53

Brass Parts, Improved, 132

      Pickle for, 132

      Platinizing, 566

      Polishes, 590

      Sand Holes in, 150

      Solders, 657

      to Cast Yellow, 54

      Tombac Color on, 130

      Unpolished Coloring, 128

      Varnishes Imitating Gold, 725

Brassing, 572, 581

      Zinc, Steel, Cast Iron, 581

Brassware, Gold Lacquers for. 440

Bread, Dog, 265

Breath, Fetid, Remedies for, 133

      Perfumes, 258

Brewers' Yeast, 339

Brick and Tilemakers' Glazed

Bricks, 164

      Arches, Waterproofing, 741

Brickbat, Cheese, 176

Brick, Blood-red Stain, 166

      Colors, 165

Brickmakers' Notes, 167

Brick Polishes, 600

      Stain, 133, 166

      Walls, to Clean, 197

to Renovate, 190

      Waterproofing, 134

Bricks, 164

      Glaze for, 377

      of Sand-lime, 689

      Polish for, 600

Brie, Cheese, 176

Brightening Pickle, 469

Bright Red Rouge, 229

Brilliantine, 390

      Florician, 483

Brimstone (Burning), 611

Bristol Brass (Prince's Metal), 53

Britannia Metal, 55

to Clean, 201

 

Silver-plating, 587

British Champagne, 118

      Oil, 484

Brocchieri's Styptic, 701

Brocq's Pomade for Itching, 228

Broken Bones, A Test for, 124

Bromine, Antiseptic, 100

Bromoform, 134

      Rum, 134

Bronze, Aluminum, 56

      Annealing, 56

      Articles, Polish for, 591

      Casting, 150

      Cleaning, 202, 205

      Coloring, 138

      Dye, 272

      for Brass, 136

      Gilding, 137

      Leather, 447

      Lettering, 456

      Machine, 58

      Phosphor, 58

      Polishes, 591

      Powder, Liquid for, 567

Bronze Powders, 134, 139

      Preparations, 135

Bronze, Renovation of, 205

Silicon, 61

Steel, 61

Substitutes, 137

      Tincture, 135, 137

      to Renovate, 201

      Varnishes, 726

Bronzes, 55

      Art, 57

      Pickle for, 138

      Statuary, 57

Bronzing, 566

      and Patinizing of Articles, 136

      Engraved Ornaments, 137

      General Directions for, 135

      Liquid, 136

      Metals, 567

      of Brass, 571

      of Gas Fixtures, 566

      of Wood, 782

      of Zinc, 137

      Solutions for Paints, 489

      with Soluble Glass, 139

Brooches, Photographing on, 551

Brown Dye for Cotton, 267

      for Silk, 267

      for Wool, 267

and Silk, 267

      Hair Dye, 390

Browning of Steel, 583

Brown Ink, 414

      Ointment, 486

      Oxidation on Bronze, 139

      Shoe Dressing, 632

Brownstone, Imitation, 133

Brown Tints, 559

      Varnish, 726

Brunette or Rachelle Powder, 242

Brushes, 140

Bubble (Soap), Liquid, 655

Bubbles, 141

      in Gelatine, 370

Buff Terra-Cotta Slip, 166

      Wheels, Rouge for, 618

Bug Killers, 420

Building Blocks, Concrete, 691

Bunions, 224

Burning Banana Trick, 103

      Brimstone, 611

      Sealing Wax, 611

Burns, 486

      Carbolic Acid, 147

      Mixture for, 142

Burnt Alum, 80

      Steel, to Restore, 686

Butter, 142, 354

      Artificial, Tests for, 354

      Color, 142, 359

Buttermilk, Artificial, 143

Buttons of Artificial Agate, 44

      Platine for, 80

 

 

[C]

Cadmium Alloy, about the Hardness of Zinc, 77

Alloys, 61, 64

            with Gold, Silver, and Copper, 62

Amalgams, Applications of, 87

Calcium Carbide, 144

      Sulphide (Luminous), 494

Camera, Renovating a, 553

Campchello, 117

Camphor for Cholera, 180

Camphorated and Carbolated Powders, 252

Cold Cream, 226

Ice, 145

Pomade, 145

Preparations, 144

 


[790]

 

INDEX

 

Camphorated Substitutes in the Preparation of Celluloid, 157

Canary-Bird Food, 729

      Paste, 145

Canary Birds, Their Diseases, 729

Concrete, 689 [mis-indexed?]

Candles, 145

      Coloring, 145, 146

      Fumigating, 365

      Transparent, 145

Candy, 216

      Colors and Flavors, 218

      Orange Drops, 216

Canned Vegetables, 352

Canning, 602

      without Sugar, 603

Cantharides and Modern Potato Bug Poison, 94

      Pomade, 392

Can Varnish, 720

Canvas Waterproofing, 742

Caoutchouc, 618

      Solution for Paints, 719

Capacities of Utensils, 703

Capsule Varnish, 720

Capping Mixtures for Bottles, 126

Caramels, 146, 216

Caramel in Food, 352

12-Carat, 433

4-Carat Gold, 433

18-Carat Gold for Rings, 433

22-Carat Solder, 433

Carats, to Find the Number of, 432

Carbolic Acid, 147

Carbolic-acid Burns, 147

      Decolorization of, 147

      Disguising Odor of, 147

Carbolic Powder, 263

      Soap, 647

Carbolineum, 497

Carbonated Pineapple Champagne, 118

Carbon Ink, 403

      Paper, 503

      Printing, 531

      Process in Photography, 531

Carbuncle Remedies, 121

Cardboard or Leather Glue, 15

      Waterproofing, 751

Cards (Playing), to Clean, 209

Care of Refrigerators, 401

Carmelite Balm Water, 519

Carmine, 403

      Lake Dye for Wall Paper, 278

Carnation Lake Dye, 277

Carpet Preservation, 399

      Soap, 644

Carpets, How to Preserve, 399

Carriage-top Dressing, 448

Carron Oil, 242

Case Hardening, 648

Casein, 34, 148

      Albumen, and Glue, 34

      Cements, 20

      Massage Cream, 233

      Paste, 38

      Varnish, 34

Cashmere Perfumery, 516

Casket Trimmings, 150

Casks, 149

      Watertight, 149

Cassius, Purple of, 383

Cast Brass, 53

Cast-brass Work, Sand Holes in, 150

Castile Soap, to Cut, 644

Casting, 149

      Copper, 63

      in Wax, 755

      Molds, Alloys for, 80

      of Soft Metal Castings, 151

Castings, Making in Aluminum, 81

Castings Out of Various Metals, 149

      to Soften Iron, 427

Cast-iron Soldering, 666

Castor Oil, 153

Castor-oil Chocolate Lozenges, 154

Castor Oil, How to Take, 154

      Tasteless, 153

Casts from Wax Models, 755

      (Plaster), Preservation of, 565

      Repairing of Broken, 26

      Waterproofing, 565

Catatypy, 154

Cat Diseases and Remedies, 732

Caterpillar Destroyers, 423

Catgut, 155

      Sutures, Preparation of, 155

Catsup, Adulterated, 353

Cattle Dips and Applications, 264

Caustic Potash Poison, 93, 94

Ceiling Cleaners, 400

Celery Clam Punch, 112

      Compound, 155

Cellars, Waterproof, 400

Celloidin Paper, 504

Cells, Solutions and Fillers for Battery, 104

Celluloid, 155

Cements and Glues, 17

      Glue for, 12

      Lacquer, 439

      of Reduced Inflammability, 159

      Putty, 161

Cement, 692

      Armenian, 20

      Asbestos, 30

      Cheap and Excellent, 30

      Colors, 688

      Diamond Glass, 29

      for Belts, 31

      for Chemical Apparatus, 31

      for Cracks in Stoves, 162

      for Enameled Dials, 20

      for General Use, 31

      for Glass, 21, 25, 28

      for Iron and Marble, 17

      for Ivory, 31

      for Leather and Iron, 25

      for Metals, 21, 25

      for Metal on Hard Rubber, 22

      for Pallet Stones, 162

      for Pasteboard and Paper, 21

      for Patching Boots, 23

      for Pipe Joints, 162

      for Porcelain Letters, 19

      for Sandstones, 17

      for Steam and Water Pipes, 161

      for Watch-lid, 20

      for Waterpipe, 162

      Hydraulic, 33

Cementing Celluloid and Hard-rubber Articles, 18

Cement Jewelers, 20

Mordant for, 479

      on Marble Slabs, 16

      Paints for, 499

      Parisian, 30

      Protection of, Against Acid, 9

      Rubber for Cloth, 24

      to Paint Over Fresh, 499

      Transparent for Glass, 29

      Strong, 30, 32

      Universal, 31

      Work, Protection for, 162

Cements, 16, 161

      Amber, 26

      Aquarium, 31

      Casein, 20

      Celluloid, 17

      for Attaching Letters on Glass, 19

      for Fastening Porcelain to Metal, 25

Cements, for Iron, 24

      for Leather, 22, 23

      for Metals, 24

      for Rubber, 22

      for Stone, 16

      for Tires, 23

      for Water-glass, 19

      Meerschaum, 30

      Sign-letters, 18

      Silicate of Oxychloride, 35

Ceramics, 164

Chain of Fire, 612

Chains (Watch), to Clean, 206

Chalk for Tailors, 164

Chamois Skin, to Clean, 186

Champagne, 118

      Cider, 181

Chapped Skin, 232

Chappine Cream, 237

Charta Sinapis, 480

Chartreuse, 769

Cheddar Cheese, 176

Cheese, 174

      Color, 359

      Wrapping, Tin Foil for, 474

Chemical Apparatus, Cement for, 31

      Gardens, 368

      Reagents, 349

Cherry Balsam, 103

      Cordial, 764

      Phosphate, 112

      Tooth Paste, 257

Chewing Candy, 217

      Gums, 178

Cheshire Cheese, 176

Chestnut Brown Dye for Straw Bonnets, 267

      Hair Dye, 391

Chicken Bouillon, 112

Chicken-coop Application, 419

Chicken Diseases, 734

Chicory, Tests for, 353

Chilblains, 486

Children, Doses for, 265

Children's Tooth Powder, 255

China, 173

      Pomade, 227

      Repairing, 601

      Riveting, 179

      Silver Alloy, 75

      to Toughen, 173

Chinese Tooth Paste, 257

Chlorides, Platt's, 264

Chloriding Mineral Lubricating

      Oils, 462

Chlorine-proofing, 9

Chocolate, 179

      and Milk, 114

      Castor-oil Lozenges, 154

      Extracts, 312

      Frappé, 114

      Hot, 111

      Soda Water, 111

Cholera Remedies, 179

Chowchow, 212

Chrome Black Dye for Wool, 267

Chromium Glue, 15

Chromo Making, 180

Cider, 180

      Preservative, 181

      Vinegar, 735

Cigarettes, Asthma, 101

Cigar Flavoring, 183

      Sizes and Colors, 182

      Spots, 183

Cigars, 182

Cinnamon Essence, 312

 

Oil as an Antiseptic, 100

      or Brown Dye for Cotton and Silk, 267

Cinchona, 771

      Pomade, 392

Citrate of Magnesium, 464

Clam Bouillon, 113

 


[791]

 

INDEX

 

Claret Lemonade, 110

      Punch, 110, 112

Clarification of Gelatin and Glue, 370

Clarifying, 184

      Muddy Water, 741

Clay, 33, 184

Claying Mixture for Forges, 184

Clean Bronze, 202

Cleaner, Universal, 209

Cleaning Linoleum, 398

      Marble, 196

      Polished Woodwork, 194

      Brass on Clock, 206

      Bronze Objects, 205

      Clocks, 207

      Copper, 200

      Copper Sinks, 202

      Electro-plate Goods, 205

      Funnels and Measures, 204

      Gilded Work on Altars, 185

      Gilded Articles, 185

      Gilded Bronzes, 205

      Gilt Bronze Ware, 201

      Glass, Paste for, 208

      Inferior Gold Articles, 207

      Lamp Globes, 209

      Marble, Furniture, etc., 197

      Methods and Processes, 209

      of Copperplate Engravings, 309

      of Statuettes and Plaster Objects, 564

      of Walls, Ceilings, and Paper, 190, 397

      Oil Stains on Wall Paper, 190

      Optical Lenses, 208

      Paint Brushes, 140

      Painted and Varnished Surfaces, 194

      Painted Doors, Walls, etc., 190

      Pearls, 208

      Preparations, 184, 397, 590, 644

      Preparation for Glass with Metal Decorations, 208

      Pewter Articles, 205

      Powder, 194

      Skins and Leather, 186

      Silver-plated Ware, 200

      Terra Cotta, 197

      Tracings, 194

      Varnish Brushes, 141

      Wall Paper, 191

      Whitewashed Walls, 190

      Window Panes, 208

Cleansing Fluids, 185

Clearing Baths, 535

Cleary's Asthma Fumigating Powder, 101

Cliche Metal, 52

Clock-bell Repairing, 737

Clock Cleaning, 207

Clock-dial Lettering, 737

Clock Hands, to Reblack, 738

Clockmakers' Cleaning Processes, 206

Clock Oil, 482

      Repairing, 738

Clothes and Fabric Cleaners, 191

      Cleaners, 191

Clothes-Cleaning Fluids, 192

Cloth Paper, 504

      Strips Attached to Iron, 14

      to Iron, Gluing, 37

      Waterproofing, 748

Cloths for Polishing, 599

Clouding of Mouth Mirrors, 477

Cloudless Caramel Coloring, 146

Clove Pink Perfumery, 516

Coal Oil, 484

Coals, to Eat Burning, 612

Coating for Bathrooma, 498

      for Damp Walls, 499

      for Name Plates, 501

      Metallic Surfaces with Glass, 377

      Tablets with Chocolate, 179

Cobaltizing of Metals, 573

Cobalt, or Fly Powder Poison, 94

Cochineal Insect Remedy, 422

Cocoa Mint, 115

      Syrup, 112

Cocoas, 112

Cod Liver Oil and Its Emulsion, 482

Coffee, 353

Cocktail, 114

      Cordial, 763

      Cream Soda, 113

      Essence, 314

      Extracts, 313

      for the Soda Fountain, 111

      Frappé, 114

      Hot, 111

      Iced, 114

      Nogg, 114, 115

      Substitutes for, 210

      Syrups, 313

Coil Spring, 683

      Springs, to Temper, 683

Coin Cleaning, 200

      Metal, 62

Coins, Impressions of, 467

      Matrix for, 467

Colas, 728

Cold and Cough Mixtures, 211

Chemical Gilding, 577

Cream, 225

      Enameling, 721

      Soldering, 666

      Varnish, 543

Colic in Cattle, 729

Collapsible Tubes, Skin Cream, 239

      Tooth Paste for, 257

Collodion, 212

Cologne, 514

      for Headaches, 394

      Spirits or Deodorized Alcohol, 514

Coloration of Copper and Brass

      with Cupric Selenite, 568

Colored Alloys for Aluminum, 50

      Celluloid, 161

      Fireproofing, 344

      Fires, 609

      Floor Polishes, 591

      Gilding, 577

      Glass, 165, 371

      Gold Alloys, 66

      Hygroscopes, 402

      Inks, 414

      Lacquer, 439

      Marking Inks, 407

      Rings on Metal, 582

      Sand, 628

Coloring Benedine Green, 106

      Brass, 473

      Ceresine Candles for the Christmas Tree, 1*45

Common Gold, 431

Copper, 473

      Electric-light Bulbs and Globes, 371

      Fluid for Brass, 129

      Gold Jewelry, 430

Incandescent Lamps, 442

      Matter in Fats, 334

      Metals, 471, 568

      of Brass, 128, 570

      of Modeling Plaster, 563

      Perfumes, 511

      Silver, 640

      Soap, 644

      "Spirit" Varnishes, 715

      Steel, 682

      Unpolished Brass, 128

Colorings for Jewelers' Work, 433

Color Enamel, 721

      Photography, 548

      Stains, for Wood, 782

 

 

 

Color Stamps for Rough Paper, Testing, 559

Colors, 266

      and Sizes of Cigars, 182

for Confectionery, 218

for Paints, 555

for Polished Brass, 127

for Pomade, 228

for Syrups, 702

Fusible Enamel, 306

Combined Alum and Hypo Bath, 535

      Toning and Fixing Baths, 542

Comfortable, Washing, 399

Commercial Enameling, 290

Formaldehyde, 362

Mucilage, 43

Common Silver for Chains, 434

      Silver Solder, 434

Composition Files, 339

      for Cleaning Copper, Nickel,

      and other Metals, 203

for Linoleum, Oilcloth, etc., 459

for Writing on Glass, 376

of Various Hard Spiders, 663

Compositions for Ships' Bottoms, 498

Compost for Indoor Plants, 337

Compound for Cleaning Brass, 203

Salicylated Collodion Corn Cure, 224

      Solution of Thymol, 100

Concentrated Lye Poison, 93

Concrete, 689

      Blocks, Properties of, 695

Tamping of, 695

Concrete Block Systems, 694

Building Block, 691

Mixers, 693

Condimental Sauces, 353

Condiments, 212

      Tests for Adulterated, 349

Condition Powders, 729

      for Cattle, 729

Conductivity of Aluminum Alloys, 48

Confectionery, 216

      Colors, 218

Constipation in Birds, 729

Contracted Hoof or Sore Feet in Cattle, 730

Conversion of Metric into English Measure, 760

Cooling Screen, 616

Cooking Vessels, Glazes for, 377

Cook's Table, 703

Cooper's Pen Metal, 74

Copal Varnish, 720

Copper, 219

Alloys, 51, 76

Amalgam, 90

      Amalgams, Applications of, 87

and Brass Gilding, 577

            Platinizing, 586

A Permanent Patina for, 585

Arsenic, 63

      Articles, Polish for, 591

Bronzing, 566

Cleaning, 200

Coloring, 221, 473

Enameling, 294

Etching, 324

in Food, 351

Iron, 63

Lacquers, 439

Nickel, 63

Paint for, 495

Paper, 507

      Patinizing and Plating, 586

Polishes, 590

Separation of Gold from, 382

Copper-Silver Alloy, 75

 


[792]

 

INDEX

 

Copper, Silver, and Cadmium Alloys, 76

      Solder for Plating, 434

      Solders, 659

      to Bronze, 136

      Varnishes, 726

Coppering, 572

 

Glass, 572

      Plaster Models, etc., 573

      Zinc Plate, 573

Copying Ink, 415

      Printed Pictures, 222

      Process on Wood, 222

Cordage, 223

      Lubricant, 463

      Waterproofing, 753

Cordials, 763

Cork as a Preservative, 606

      Cleaner, 210

      to Metal, Fastening, 36

Corks, 223

      Impermeable and Acid-proof, 10

      to Clean, 210

      Waterproofing, 742

Corn Plaster, 224

      Cures, 224

Corrosive Sublimate Poison, 94

Cosmetic Jelly, 232

Cosmetics, 225

Cottenham Cheese, 176

Cotton, 245

      Belts, Lubrication, 462

      Degreasing, 246

Cottonseed, Extracting Oil, 482

      Hulls as Stock Food, 246

      Oil, 482

      Compress Cough Balsam with Iceland Moss, 211

      Drops, 217

      Mixtures and Remedies, 211

for Cattle, 730  

      Syrup, 211

Counter Polishes, 590

Court Plasters, 247, 563

Cow Diseases Remedies, 730

      Powder, 730

Cow's Milk, Powder for, 732

Cracked Leather, 448

Cracks in Tools, to Render Visible, 686

Crayons, 374

      for Graining and Marbling, 247

      for Writing on Glass, 374

Cream, 247

      Beef Tea, 112

      Bonbons for Hoarseness, 216

      Cheese, 176

      How to Determine, 474

      Soda Powder, 628

Creams for the Face and Skin, 225

Creosote-carbolic Acid Poison, 94

Cresol Emulsion, 248

Crimson Dye for Silk, 271

      Indelible Ink, 406

Crystal Cements, 248

Crystalline Coatings or Frostwork on Glass or Paper, 376

      Honey Pomade, 227

Crystallization, Ornamental, 368

Crockery, 167

      Plaster and Meerschaum Repairing, 27

Crocus, 248

Crude Petroleum, Emulsion of, 521

Crushed Apricot, 365, 604

      Cherries, 365, 604

      Fruit Preserving, 604

      Orange, 365, 604

      Peach, 365, 604

      Pineapples, 364, 604

      Raspberry, 364

      Strawberry, 364

Cucumber Creams, 237

Cucumber Essence, 314

      Jelly, Juice, and Milk, 228

      Juice, 239

      Milk, 239

      Pomade, 228

Cummins's Whipped Cream, 248

Curagoa Cordial, 764

      Liqueur, 770

Cure for Barber's Itch, 486

      for Snake Bites, 96

      for Tan, 242

      for Warts, 736

Currant Cream, 115

Curry Powder, 213

Curtains, Coloring of, 446

Cutlers' Cements for Fixing Knife Blades into Handles, 16

Cutlery Cements, 16

Cutting, Drilling, Grinding, and Shaping Glass, 371

Cuspidor Powder, 263

Custard Powder, 249

Cyanide of Potassium Poison, 93

Cylinder Oil, 464

Cymbal Metal, 64

Cypress Water, 519

 

[D]

Dairy Products, 354

Damaskeening, 249

      by Electrolysis, 249

      on Enamel Dials, 250

Damp Walls, Coating for, 400, 499

Damson Cheese, 176

Dandruff Cures, 388

Darcet Alloy, 64

Dark-blue Dye, 268

Dark Gold Purple, 383

Dark-Green Blackboard Paint, 489

Dark Red Grease Paint, 229

      Snuff -Brown Dye for Wool, 267

      Steel Dye, 269

Deadening Paint, 491

Dead-gilding of an Alloy of Copper and Zinc, 579

Dead, or Matt, Dip for Brass, 131

Deadly Nightshade Poison, 94

Decalcomania Processes, 250

Decolorization of Carbolic Acid, 147

Decolorizing and Deodorizing

Oils, 484

      or Bleaching Linseed Oil, 483

Decomposition of Oils, Fats, 484

Decorating Aluminum, 81

Decorative Metal Varnishes, 726

      Wood-finish, 772

Deep Red Grease Paint, 229

      Red Raspberry Syrup, 318

Dehorners or Horn Destroyers, 397

Delta Metal, 63

Demon Bowls of Fire, 611

Denaturized Alcohol, 45, 678

Dental Cements, 163

      Platinum, 74

Dentrifices, 251

Deodorants for Water-closets, 263

Deodorization of Calcium Carbide, 144

Deodorized Alcohol, 514

      Cod Liver Oil, 482

      Petroleum, 522

Deodorizing Benzine, 106

Depilatory Cream, 259

Depthings, Verification of, 737

Derbyshire Cheese, 176

Desilvering, 587

Detannating Wine, 765

Detecting Dyed Honey, 396

Detection of Albumen in Urine, 44

      of Formaldehyde in Food, 351

in Milk, 474

      of Copper in Food, 351

      of Cottonseed Oil in Lard, 442

      of Glucose in Food, 357

      of Saccharine in Food, 351

      of Salicylic Acid in Food, 349

      of Starch in Food, 357

Detergent for Skin Stains, 235

Detergents, 186

Determination of Artificial Colors in Food, 351

      of Preservatives, 349

Determining Cream, 474

Developers for Photographic Purposes, 523

Development of Platinum Prints, 531

Dextrine Pastes, 35

Diabetics, Lemonade for, 109

Dial Cements, 20

      Cleaners, 207

      Repairing, 737

Diamalt, 475

Diamantine, 432

Diamond Cement, 20

      Glass Cement, 29

      Tests, 260

Diarrhoea in Birds, 729

      Remedies, 179

Die Venting, 261

Digestive Powders, 261

      Relish, 213

Diogen Developer, 527

Dip for Brass, 131

Dipping Metals, Danger of, 470

Dips, 469

      for Cattle, 264

Direct Coloration of Iron and Steel by Cupric Selenite, 568

Directions for Bronzing, 135

      for Making Perfumes, 512

Disinfectants, 264

Disguising Odor of Carbolic Acid, 147

Dish Washing, 399

Disinfectant for Books, 125

Disinfectants, 262

      for Sick Room, 264

Disinfecting Coating, 265

      Fluids, 262

      or Weed-killers, 262

      Powders, 262

Dissolving Old Rubber, 622

Distemper in Cattle, 729

Distinguishing Blue from Green, 121

Diuretic Ball, 731

Dog Applications, 419

      Biscuit, 265

      Soap, 654

Domestic Ointments, 486

      Pets, 732

Donarite, 330

Doors, to Clean, 190

Doses for Adults and Children, 265

Dose Table for Veterinary Purposes, 729

Double Extract Perfumery, 518

Drawing Inks, 403

      Paper, 504

      Temper from Brass, 133

Drawings, Preservation of, 266

      to Clean, 206

Draw-tempering Cast Steel, 687

Dressing for Carriage Tops, 448

      for Sewing Thread, 706

Dressings for Harness, 451

      for Leather, 448

      for Linoleum, 459

      for the Hair, 389

 


[793]

 

INDEX

 

Dried Casein, its Mfg., 148

      Yolk of Egg, 284

Driers, 636

Driffield Oils, 485

Drill Chips, to Utilize, 686

Drilling Hard Steel, 687

Lubricant for, 463

Shaping, and Filing Glass, 372

Drinking Water, Removal of Iron from, 741

Drinks for Summer and Winter 107

      Soda Water, 111

Drops of Lime in the Eye, 333

      Table of, 704

Drosses, 151

Dry Bases for Paints, 489

Perfumes, 509

      Powder Fire Extinguishers, 341

Rot, Remedies for, 618

Sugar Preserving, 604

Yeast, 786

Drying Oils, 485

Druggists' Label Paste, 41

Dubbing for Leather, 460

Duesseldorff Mustard, 215

Dunlop Cheese, 176

Durable Bronze on Banners, 137

      Putty, 607

Dust-laying, 485

Dust Preventers and Cloths, 401

Dutch (HoUand) Cheese, 176

      Pink Dye, 278

Dyeing Feathers, 335

Leather, 450

      Silk or Cotton Fabrics, 280

Straw Hats, 394

Dyes, 266

      and Dyestuffs, 274

      Colors, etc., for Textile Goods, 279

      for Artificial Flowers, 272

for Feathers, 272

for Food, 359

for Furs, 272

for Hats, 273

for Leather, 450

Dye Stains, Removal from Skin, 184

Dynamite, 329

 

[E]

 

Earthenware, 168

Easily Fusible Alloys, 64

Eastman's Sepia Paper, 531

Eaton's Styptic, 701

Eau de Botot Water, 519

      de Lais Water, 519

      de Merveilleuse Water, 519

      de Quinine, 392

Eberle's Whipped Cream, 248

Ebony, 783

      Lacquer, 439

      Stains, 782

Eczema Dusting Powder, 282

Edible Oils, 355

Effervescent Bath Tablets, 103

      Powders, 627

Eggs, 282, 355

Egg Chocolate, 114

      Claret, 115

      Coffee, 115

      Creme de Menthe, 115

      Dyes, 275

      Lemonade, 111, 115

      Malted Milk Coffee, 114

      Oil, 284

      Orgeat, 115

      Phosphate, 113

      Powder, 284

      Shampoo, 393

      Sherbet, 115

      Sour, 115

      Wine, 118

Egg-stain Remover, 201

Eikonogen Developer, 524

Ektogan, 98

Elaine Substitute, 286

Elastic Glue, 14

      Limpid Gum Varnishes, 720

      or Pliable Paste, 39

Substitute for Celluloid, 158

Electrical Conductivity of Aluminum Alloys, 50

Electric Installations, Fusible Alloys for, 64

      Insulation, 425

      Light Bulbs, Coloring, 371

Electrodeposition Processes, 571

Electro-etching, 324

Electrolysis in Boilers, 123

Electroplating and Electrotyping, 286

Elm Tea, 288

Embalming Fluids, 288

Embroideries, Stamping Powder for, 680

Embroidery, Ink for, 411

Emerald, Imitation, 370

Emery, 289

 

Grinder, 289

      Substitute, 289

Emmenthaler Cheese, 176

Emollient Skin Balm, 234

Emulgen, 290

Emulsifiers, 289

Emulsion, Cresol, 248

      of Bromoform, 134

Emulsions of Petroleum, 521

Enamel Colors, 727

      for Copper Cooking Vessels, 305

      for Vats, 721

      How to Remove, 189

      Letters Attaching to Glass, 19

      Mixing, 302

      Removers, 187

      Solder, 434

      Varnishes, 720

Enameled Dials, Cement for, 20

      Iron Recipes, 305

Enameling, 290

      Alloys, 67

Enamels, Metallic Glazes on, 173

      Unaffected by Hot Water, 721

Engines (Gasoline), Anti-freezing Solution for, 363

English Margarine, 143

      Pink Dye, 278

      Weights and Measures, 758

Engravers' Varnishes, 723

Engraving, Matting, and Frosting Glass, 375

      on Steel, 687

      or Etching on Steel, 687

      Spoon Handles, 309

Engravings, their Preservation, 309

      to Reduce, 310

      to Transfer, 710

Enlargements, 542

Envelope Gum, 43

Epicure's Sauce, 213

Epizooty, 731

Eradicators, 205

Erasing Powder or Pounce, 189

Essence Benedictine, 769

      of Anchovies, 98

      of Cinnamon, 312

      of Extract of Soup Herbs, 212

      of Savory Spices, 214

Essences and Extracts of Fruits, 310, 312

Etching, 322

      Bath for Brass, 324

for Tin, 706

      Copper, Brass, and Tombac, Fluids, 322

      Fluid for Aluminum, 324

Etching, Fluid, for Brass, 323

to Make Stencils, 323

for Copper, Zinc, and Steel, 324

            for Gold, 324

for Lead, Antimony, and Britannica Metal, 324

for Tin or Pewter, 324

for Zinc, 323

Fluids for Copper, 325

for Iron and Steel, 322

for Silver, 324

      Glass by Means of Glue, 326

-ground for Copper Engraving, 322

on Copper, 324

on Glass, 325

on Ivory, 327, 428

on Marble, 327

on Steel, 687

Powder for Iron and Steel, 323

                  for Metals, 324

Steel, Liquids for, 327

with Wax, 326

Eucalyptus Bonbons, 212

      Paste, 257

Examination of Foods, 352

Expectorant Mixtures, 212

Explosives, 328, 330

Exposures in Photographing, 528

Extemporaneous Anchovy Sauce, 98

Extract, Ginger-ale, 107

      of Meat Containing Albumen, 361

      of Milk, 474

Extracting Oil from Cottonseed. 482

Extracts, 312

Coffee, 313

Eye, Foreign Matter in, 333

Eyeglasses, 376

Eye Lotions, 333

 

 

[F]

 

Fabric Cleaners, 191

Fabrics, Waterproofing of, 742

Facade Paint, 499

Face Black and Face Powder, 230

      Bleach or Beautifier, 231

      Cream without Grease, 239

      Powder, Fatty, 230

Faded Photographs, 544

Fairthorne's Dental Cement, 163

Falling Hair. 392

Fancy Soda Drinks, 113

Fastening Cork to Metal, 36

Fats, 333, 334, 335

      Decomposition of, 484

      for Soldering, 659

Fatty Acid Fermentation Process, 334

Face Powders, 230

Feather Bleaching and Coloring, 121, 335

      Dyes, 272, 335

Felt Waterproofing, 749

Fermentation, Prevention of, 765

      Process, Fatty Acid, 334

Ferro-argentan, 71

Ferro-prussiate Paper, 539

Ferrpus-oxalate Developer, 525

Fertilizer with Organic Matter,

      for Pot Flowers, 337

Fertilizers, 336

      Bone, 338

Fever in Cattle, 731

Fig Squares, 216

File Alloys, 64

      Metal, 64

Files, 339

      Geneva Composition, 64

      to Clean, 205, 339

      Vogel's Composition, 64

 


[794]

 

INDEX

 

Filigree Gilding, 576

Fillers for Letters, 457

      for Wood, 773

Film-stripping, 553

Filter Paper, 504

Filters for Water, 339

Finger-marks, to Remove, 125

Fingers, Pyrogallic-acid Stains on, 185

Finger-tips, Sparks from, 611

Finishing Enamel for White Furniture, 722

Firearm Lubricants, 460

Firearms, Oil for, 460

Fire, Chain of, 612

      Colored, 609

Grenades, Substitutes for, 341

      Trick, 611

      Extinguishers, 340

Fireproof and Waterproof Paints, 491

      Coating, 344

      Compositions, 344

      Glue, 16

      Paints, 490

      Papers, 344, 504

Fireproofing, 341, 344

      Celluloid, 159

      Clothing, 342

      for Wood, Straw, Textiles, 343

      Light Woven Fabrics, 342

      Mosquito Netting, 342

      Rope and Straw Matting, 342

      Stage Decorations, 342

      Tents, 342

Fireworks, 608

Fish Bait, 344

Fishing Net, Preservation of, 223

Fixing and Clearing Baths, 535

      Agents in Perfumes, 512

      Baths for Paper, 542

Fixatives for Crayon Drawings, etc., 344

Flabby Skin, Wash for, 234

Flashlight Apparatus, 552

Apparatus with Smoke Trap, 552

Flannels, Whitening of, 446

Flavoring Cigars, 183

      Extracts, 355

      Peppermint as a, 252

      Sarsaparilla, 629

Flavorings, 213

      for Dentifrice, 255

      Spices, 213

Flea Destroyers, 423

Flesh Face Powder, 243

Flexible Ivory, 428

Flies and Paint, 501

      in the House, 399

Floor Coating, 500

      Dressings, 344

      Oils, 485

      Paper, 506

      Polish, 591

      Varnishes, 724

      Waterproofing, 753

      Wax, 754

Floral Hair Oil, 483

      Hair Pomade, 483

Florentine Bronzes, 136

Floricin Brilliantine, 483

      Oil, 483

Florida Waters, 514

Flower Preservatives, 345

Flowers, Coloring for, 346

Flour and Starch Compositions, 35

      Paste, 39

Fluid Measure, U. S. Standard, 704

Fluid Measures, 758

Fluids, Clothes-cleaning, 192

      Disinfecting, 262

      for Embalming, 288

      for Soldering, 659

Fluorescent Liquids, 347

Fluxes for Soldering, 660

      Used in Enameling, 305

Flux for Enameled Iron, 305

Fly Essences, 421

Fly-papers and Fly-poisons, 347

Fly-killers, 421

Fly Protectives for Animals, 419

Foam Preparations, 348

Foamy Scalp Wash, 389

Foreign Matter in the Eye, 333

Food Adulterants, Tests for, 348

      Benzoic Acid in, 107

      Colorants, 358

      Cooked in Copper Vessels, 94

Foods, Bird, 120, 729

      for Pets, 733

      for Red Birds, 729

Foot Itch, 733

Foot-powders and Solutions, 361

Footsores on Cattle, 730

Formaldehyde, 362

      for Disinfecting Books, 263

      in Milk, Detection of, 474

Formalin for Grain Smut, 384

      Treatment of Seed Grain for

      Smut, 384

Formol Albumen for Preparation of Celluloid, 156

Formulas for Bronzing Preparations, 135

for Cements for Repairing Porcelain, Glassware, Crockery, Plaster, and Meerschaum, 27

      to Drive Ants Away, 420

Foul Brood in Bees, 105

Fowler's Solution Poison, 93

Foxglove, or Digitalis Poison, 94

Foy's Whipped Cream, 248

Fragrant Naphthalene Camphor, 14

Frames, Protection from Flies, 363

Frame Cleaning, 185

      Polishes, 600

Framing, Passe-partout, 508

Frangipanni Perfumery, 516

Frankfort Black, 561

Freckle Lotions, 240

Freckles and Liver Spots, 241

Freezing Mixtures, 615, 616

      Preventives, 363

French Brandy, 768

      Bronze, Preparation of, 136

      Dentrince, 256

Floor Polish, 591

      Gelatin, 369

      Hide Tanning Process, 453

      Solders for Silver, 664

      Varnish, 724

Fresh Crushed Fruits, 365

Frost Bite, 363

      Preventive, 363

      Removers, 376

Frosted Glass, 374

      Mirrors, 375

Frosting Polished Silver, 640

Fruit Essences and Extracts, 310

Frappé, 116

      Jelly Extract, 314

      Preserving, 364, 604

      Products, 357

      Syrups, 701

      Vinegar, 735 i

Fuel, 152

Fuller's Purifier for Cloths, 274

Fulminates, 332

Fulminating Antimony, 332

      Bismuth, 332

      Copper, 332

      Mercury, 333

      Powder, 333

      Silver, 640

Fumigants, 365

Fumigating Candles, 365

Funnels, to Clean, 204

Furnace Jacket, 368

Furniture Cleaners, 206

      Enamel, 722

      Its Decoration, 772

      Polishes, 592

      Wax, 754

Fuses, 610

      for Electrical Circuits, 64

Fusible Alloys for Electric Installations, 64

Enamel Colors, 306

      Safety Alloys for Steam Boilers, 65

Fusion Point of Metals, 473

 

[G]

Galvanized Iron, 496

Roofing, 397

      Paper, 507

Gamboge Stain, 439

Gapes in Poultry, 734

Garancine Process, 277

Gardens, Chemical, 368

Garment-cleaning Soap, 645

Gas Fixtures, 130

      Bronzing of, 566

Gasoline Pumps, Packing for, 488

Gas Soldering, 660

      Stove, to Clean, 202

      Trick, 610

Gear Lubricant, 463

Gelatin, 369

      Air Bubbles in, 370

Gems, Artificial, 370

Gem Cements, 20

Geneva Composition Files, 64

Genuine Silver Bronze, 140

German Matches, 467

      Method of Preserving Meat, 361

      Silver or Argentan, 69

German-silver Solders, 661

German Table Mustard, 215

Gilders' Sheet Brass, 55

      Wax, 755

Gilding, 493

      and Gold Plating, 575

German Silver, 578

Glass, 373, 578

      in Size, 493

      Metals, Powder for, 579

      Pastes, 580

      Plating and Electrotyping, 288

      Renovation of, 185

      Steel, 580

      Substitute, 575

      to Clean, 185

      Watch Movements, 738

Gilt Frames, Polish for, 600

      Test for, 383

      Work, to Burnish, 384

Ginger, 112

Ginger-Ale Extract, 107

Ginger Ale, Flavoring for, 108

Soluble Extract, 108

      Beer, 107, 108

      Extracts, 314

Gold-leaf Alloys, 67

      Striping, 383

Gold Varnish for Tin, 727

Glass, 371

Acid-proof, 374

 


[795] 

 

INDEX

 

Glass and Porcelain Cement, 28

      and Glassware Cement, 25

      Balls, Amalgam for, 90

Silvering, 587

Celluloid, and Metal Inks, 403

      Cement for, 21

      Cleaning, 208

      Coppering, Gilding, and Plating, 572

      Etching, 325

      Fastening Metals on, 25

      Gilding, 373, 578

      Globe, Silvering, 641

      How to Affix Sign-letters on, 18

      Lettering, 457

      Lubricants, 372

      Manufacturing, 373

      Polishes for, 593

      Porcelain Repairing, 26

      Refractory to Heat, 373

      Stop Cock Lubricant, 462

      Stopper, to Loosen, 700

      Silvering of, 476

      Solders for, 662

      Soluble, as a Cement, 28

      to Affix Paper on, 19

      to Cut, 371

      to Fasten Brass Upon, 17

      to Fix Gold Letters to, 18

      to Remove Glue from, 208

      to Silver, 641

      Waterproof Cements for, 21

Globes, How to Color, 371

      Silvering, 476

Glossy Paint for Bicycles, 495

Gloucester Cheese, 176

Glove Cleaners, 195

Gloves, Substitute for Rubber, 100

      Testing, 622

Glaziers' Putty, 607

Glazing on Size Colors, 377

Glaze for Bricks, 377

Glazes, 377

      and Pottery Bodies, 167

      for Cooking Vessels, 377

      for Laundry, 444

Glucose in Jelly, 357

Glue, Box, 15

      Chromium for Wood, Paper and Cloth, 15

      Clarifier, 370

      Elastic, 14

      Fireproof, 16

      for Articles of a Metallic or Mineral Character, 15

      for Attaching Cloth Strips to Iron, 14

      for Attaching Gloss to Precious Metals, 14

      for Belts, 15

      for Cardboard, 15

      for Celluloid, 12

      for Glass, 15

      for Leather or Cardboard, 15

      for Paper and Metal, 14

      for Tablets, 13

      for Uniting Metals with Fabrics, 15

      for Wood, 15

      Manufacture, 10

      Marine, 13

      for Paste for Making Paper

Boxes. 15

      Prevented from Cracking, 10

      Test, 10

      to Fasten Linoleum on Iron Stairs. 14

      to Form Paper Pads, 12

Glues. 10. 34, 378

      Liquid. 11

      Waterproof, 13

Glycerine, 378

      and Cucumber Jelly, 228

      Applications, 228, 236, 237, 239

      as a Detergent, 186

      Creams, 237

      Developer, 530

      Lotion, 379

      Milk, 239

      Process, 531

      Soap, 646, 652

Goats' Milk Cheese, 178

Gold, 379

      Acid Test for, 432

      Alloys, 66, 435

      Amalgams, 89

      and Silver Bronze Powders, 139

      Assaying of, 381

      Enameling Alloys, 67

      Enamel Paints, 493

      Etching Fluid for, 324

      Extraction of, by Amalgamation, 89

      Foil Substitutes and Gold Leaf, 747

      from Acid Coloring Baths, 381

      Imitations of, 433

      Indelible Ink, 406

      Ink, 405,415

      Jewelry, to Give a Green Color to, 582

      Lacquers, 440

      Leaf and its Applications, 492

Gold-leaf Alloys, 67

Gold-leaf Waste, to Recover, 381

Gold Lettering, 456

      Letters on Glass, Cements for

Affixing, 18

      Oil Suitable for Use, 485

      Paints, 492

Gold-plate Alloys, 67

Gold Plating, 575

      Printing on Oilcloth, 379

      Purple, 383

      Recovery of Waste, 381

      Reduction of Old Photographic, 535

      Renovator, 199

      Solders, 434, 661

      Testing, 432

      Varnish, 726, 727

      Ware Cleaner, 200

      Welding, 381

Goldenade, 114

Golden Fizz, 115

Varnishes, 724

"Golf Goblet," 114

Gong Metal, 64

Grafting Wax, 755

Grain, 384

Graining and Marbling, 247

      Colors, 556

      Crayons, 247

      of Brass, 130

      with Paint, 494

Granola, 110

Grape Glace, 114

      Juice, Preservation of, 767

Graphite Lubricating Compound, 463

 

Gravel Walks, 385

Gravers, 385

Gray Dyes, 269

      Tints, 559

Grease Eradicators, 205

      for Locomotive Axles, 462

Greasless Face Cream, 239

Grease Paints, 228

Greases, 462

      Wagon and Axle, 462

Green Bronze on Iron, 138

      Coloring for Antiseptic Solutions, 100

      Dyes, 269

Green Dye for Cotton, 269

for Silk, 269

for Wool and Silk, 269

Fustic Dye, 269

Gilding, 578

Ginger Extract, 315

      Ink, 415

      or Gold Color for Brass, 582

      or Sage Cheese, 176

      Patina Upon Copper, 585

      Salve, 486

      to Distinguish Blue from, 121

Grenades, 341

Grinder Disk Cement, Substitute for, 31

Grinding, 708

      Glass, 372

Grindstone Oil, 386

Grindstones, 386

Ground Ceramics, Laying Oil for, 485

      for Relief Etching, 322

Grounds for Graining Colors, 556

Grosser's Washing Brick, 445

Gruyere Cheese, 176

Gum Arabic, Substitute, 43, 386

      Bichromate Process, 546

      Drops, 216

      for Envelopes, 43

Gums, 386

      their Solubility in Alcohol, 386

      Used in Making Varnish, 715

Gun Barrels, to Blue, 682

      Bronze, 59

      Cotton, 331

      Lubricants, 460

Gunpowder, 328

      Stains, 387

Gutta-percha, 387

Gutter Cement, 162

Gypsum, 387

      Flowers, 346

      Paint for, 293

 

[H]

Haenkel's Bleaching Solution, 445

Hair-curling Liquids, 389

Hair Dressings and Washes, 389

      Dyes, 390

      Embrocation, 389

      for Mounting, 388

      Oil, 390

Oils, Perfumes for, 520

      Preparations, 388

      Removers, 259

      Restorers and Tonics, 389, 391

      Shampoo, 392

Hammer, to Harden, 684

Hand Bleach, 233

      Creams and Lotions, 232

Hand-cleaning Paste, 232

Handkerchief Perfumes, 516

Hand Stamps, Ink for, 411

Hands, Remove Stains from, 184, 185

      Perspiring, 233

Hard-finished Walls, 499

Hard German-silver or Steel Solder, 661

      Glaze Bricks, 164

      Lead, 71

      Metal Drilling Lubricant, 463

      Putty, 607

      Solders, 662, 664

      Solder for Gold, 661

      Wood Polish, 598

Hardened Ivory, 429

      Steel, to Solder, 665

Hardening Plaster of Paris, 564

      of Springs, 685

Steel without Scaling, 685

Steel Wire, 684

 


[796]

 

INDEX

 

Hare-lip Operation, 99

Harmless Butter Color, 143

      Colors for Use in Syrups, 321

Harness Dressings, 450

      Grease, 451

      Oils, 451

      Preparations, 450

      Pastes, 451

      Wax, 755

Hartshorn Poison, 93

Hat-cleaning Compounds, 187

Hat Waterproofing, 748

Hats, 394

      to Dye, 273

Headache Cologne, 394

      Remedies, 394

Head Lice in Children, 422

Heat-indicating Paint, 501

Heat Insulation, 426

      Prickly, 398

Heat-resistant Lacquers, 441

Heaves, 731

Hectograph Pads and Inks, 395,416

Hedge Mustard, 394

Heel Polish, 632

Hellebore Poison, 94

Helvetius's Styptic, 701

Hemlock Poison, 94

Hemorrhoids, 561

Henbane Poison, 94

Herbarium Specimens, Mounting, 394

      Pomade, 227

Herb Vinegar, 735

Hide Bound, 731

Hide-cleaning Processes, 186

Hides, 454

Hoarfrost Glass, 375

Hoarseness, Bonbons for, 216

      Remedy for, 211

Holland Cheese, 176

Hollow Concrete Blocks, 691

      Silverware, 640

Home-made Outfit for Grinding Glass, 372

      Refrigerators, 616

Honey, 396

      Clarifier, 396

      Water, 519

      Wine, 468

Honeysuckle Perfumery, 516

Honing, 761

Hoof Sores, 730

Hop Beer, 108

      Bitter Beer, 118

      Syrup, 315

Horehound Candy, 217

Horn, 396

      Bleaches, 430

      Uniting Glass with, 17

Horns, Staining, 397

Horse Blistering, 729

Horse-colic Remedy, 729

Horse Embrocations and Liniments, 731

Horses and Cattle, 729

      Treatment of Diseases, 729

Horticultural Ink, 405

Hosiery, Dye for, 268

Hostetter's Bitters, 762

Hot Beef Tea, 112

      Bouillon, 113

      Celery Punch, 112

      Chocolate and Milk, 111

      Egg Bouillon, 112

Chocolate, 111, 113

Coffee, 113

Drinks, 113

Lemonade, 113

Milk, 113

Nogg, 113

Orangeade, 111

Phosphate, 113

      Lemonades, 110, 111

      Malt, 112

Hot Malted Milk Coffee (or Chocolate), 112

Orange Phosphate, 112

Soda Toddy, 112

Soda-water Drinks, 111

Tea, 113

Household Ammonia, 91

      Formulas, 397

House Paint, 500

How to Bronze Metals, 136

to Clean a Panama Hat, 187

Brass and Steel, 202

Tarnished Silver, 204

to Color Aluminum, 80

to Keep Cigars, 187

Fruit, 364

Lamp Burners in Order, 399

to Lay Galvanized Roofing, 397

to Make Castings of Insects, 151

            a Cellar Waterproof, 400

a Plaster Cast of a Coin or Medal, 150

            Picture Postal Cards and Photographic Letter Head, 537

            Simple Syrups; Hot Process, 702

      to Open a Book, 125

to Paste Labels on Tin, 40

to Pour Out Castor Oil, 153

to Renovate Bronzes, 201

to Reproduce Old Prints, 223

to Sensitize Photographic

      Printing Papers, 539

to Take Care of Paint Brushes, 140

            Castor Oil, 154

to Tell Pottery, 173

to Unite Rubber and Leather, 22

to Tell the Character of Enamel 304

Huebner's Dental Cement, 163

Hunyadi Water, 740

Huyler's Lemonade, 110

Hydraulic Cement, 33

Hydrochinon Developer, 525

Hydrocyanic Acid Gas for Exterminating Household Insects, 418

Hydrofluoric Formulas, 326

Hydrographic Paper, 504

Hydrogen Peroxide as a Preservative, 605

Hygrometer and Its Use, 401

Hydrometers and Hygroscopes, 402

Hyoscyamus, Antidote to, 102

 

[I]

Ice, 402

      Flowers, 402

Iced Coffee, 114

Iceland Moss, Cough Mixture, 211

Ideal Cosmetic Powder, 243

Igniting Composition, 403

Imitation Black Marble, 699

      Cider, 182

      Diamonds, 432

      Egg Shampoos, 393

      Gold, 67, 433

Foils, 474

      Japanese Bronze, 138

      of Antique Silver, 640

Ivory, 429

      Platinum, 74

      Silver Alloys, 77

Bronze, 140

Foil, 474

      Stains for Wood, 784

Imogen Developer, 527

Impervious Corks, 223

Impregnation of Papers with Zapon Varnish, 506

Improved Celluloid, 156

Incandescent Lamps, 442

Incense, 366

Incombustible Bronze Tincture, 135, 137

Increasing the Toughness, Density and Tenacity of Aluminum, 83

Incrustation, Prevention of, 122

Indelible Hand-stamp Ink, 411

Inks, 405  

            for Glass or Metal, 404

      Labels on Bottles, 327

      Stencil Inks, 412

India, China or Japan Ink, 406

India-rubber Varnishes, 724

Indigo, 268, 281

Indoor Plants, Compost for, 337

Industrial and Potable Alcohol:

      Sources and Mfg., 667

Infant Foods, 359

Infants, Milk for, 475

Inflammable Explosive with Chlorate of Potash, 331

Inflammability of Celluloid Reduced, 159

Inflammation of the Udder, 731

Influenza in Cattle, 731

      in Horses, 731

Ink Eradicators, 189

      Erasers, 189

      for Laundry, 446

      for Leather Finishers, 453

      for Steel Tools, 404

      for Writing on Glass, 325, 376

on Glazed Cardboard, 404

      on Marble, 404

      Powders and Lozenges, 407

      Stains, Removing, 189

Inks, 403

      for Hand Stamps, 411

      for Shading Pen, 416

      for Stamp Pads, 410

      for Typewriters, 711

      Hectograph, 395

Inlay Varnish, 724

Inlaying by Electrolysis, 324

Insect Bites, 417

      Casting, 151

      Powders, 419, 424

      Trap, 425

Insecticides, 418

      for Animals, 419

      for Plants, 422

Instructions for Etching, 322

Instrument Alloys, 71

      Cleaning, 199

      Lacquer, 440

      Soap, 653

Instruments, to Remove Rust, 199

Insulating Varnishes, 425

Insulation, 425

      Against Heat, 426

            Moisture, Weather, etc., 426

Intensifies and Reducers, 552

International Atomic Weights, 757

Iodine Poison, 94

      Soap, 646

      Solvent, 427

Iodoform Deodorizer, 427

Iridescent Paper, 504

Iridia Perfumery, 516

Iron, 427

      and Marble, Cement for, 17

      and Steel, Etching Fluids for, 322

            Polishes, 597

            Powder for Hardening, 427

      Biting Off Red Hot, 612

      Black Paint for, 495

 


[797]

 

INDEX

 

Iron, Bronzing, 567

      Castings, to Soften, 427

      Cements for, 17, 25

      How to Attach Rubber to, 22

      Pipes, Rust Prevention for, 625

      Silver-plating, 587

      Solders, 665

      to Cement Glass to, 17

      to Clean, 204

      to Cloth, Gluing, 14

      to Color Blue, 427

      to Whiten, 427

      Varnishes, 727

Ironing Wax, 444

Irritating Plaster, 486

Itch, Barbers', 486

Ivory, 428

      and Bone Bleaches, 430

      Black, 123

      Cement, 31

      Coating for Wood, 500

      Etching on, 428

      Gilding, 579

      Polishes, 593

      Tests, 430

 

[J]

Jaborandi Scalp Waters, 392

Jackson's Mouth Wash, 259

Jandrier's Test for Cotton, 246

Japan Black, 495

            Paint, 495

Japanese Alloys, 69

      Bronze, 138

      (Gray), Silver, 76

Japanning and Japan Tinning, 724

Jasmine Milk, 240

Jelly (Fruit) Extract, 314

Jet Jewelry, to Clean, 431

Jewelers' Alloys, 433

      Cements, 20

      Cleaning Processes, 206

      Enamels, 308

      Formulas, 430

      Glue Cement, 20

Jewelry, to Clean, 206

 

[K]

Kalsomine, 436

Karats, to Find Number of, 432

Keeping Flies Out of a House, 399

Keramics, 164

Kerit, 619

Kerosene-cleaning Compounds, 193

Kerosene Deodorizer, 484

      Emulsions, 521

Ketchup (Adulterated), 353

Khaki Color Dyeing, 276

Kid, 449

      Leather Dressings, 449

      Reviver, 453

Kirschner Wine Mustard, 214

Kissingen Salts, 628

Knife-blade Cement, 16

Knife-sharpening Pastes, 615

Knockenplombe, 31

Kola Cordial, 764

      Tincture, 321

Koumiss, 116

      Substitute, 437

Krems Mustard, Sour, 215

Krems Mustard, Sweet, 215

Kiimmel, 764

Kwass, 117

 

[L]

Label Pastes, 39

Varnishes, 725

Labels on Tin, How to Paste, 40

Lac and the Art of Lacquering, 437

Lace Leather, 454

      to Clean Gold and Silver, 193

Laces, Washing and Coloring of, 446

Lacquer for Aluminum, 438

      for Brass, 438

      for Bronze, 438

      for Copper, 439

      for Oif Paintings, 440

      for Microscopes, etc., 440

      for Stoves and other Articles, 441

Lacquered Ware, to Clean, 195

Lacquers, 437

      for Papers, 441

Lakes, 277

Lampblack, 441

Lamp Burners, to Clean, 200, 399

Lamps, 442

Lanoline Creams, 238

      Hair Wash, 389

      Soap, 647

      Toilet Milk, 239

Lantern Slides, 532

Lard, 442

Lathe Lubricant, 461

Laudanum Poison, 95

Laundry Blue, 443

Tablets, 444

      Gloss Dressing, 444

      Inks, 399

      Preparations, 443

      Soap, 654

Laundrying Laces, 446

Laurel Water, Poison, 93

Lavatory Deodorant, 398

Lavender Sachets, 510

      Water, 514

Lawn Sand, 629

Laxatives for Cattle, etc., 732

Lead, 48, 446

      Alloys, 48, 71

      Amalgams, Application of, 88

      Paper, 507

      Plate, Tinned, 589

      Poison, 95

      to Take Boiling, in the Mouth, 612

Leaf Brass, 54

Leaks, 446

      in Boilers, Stopping, 608

Leather, 447

      and Rubber Cements, 22

      as an Insulator, 426

      Cements for, 23

Leather-cleaning Processes, 186

Leather Dyeing, 450

Lac, 441

Lubricants, 460

      or Cardboard Glue, 15

      Painting on, 455

Polish Lac, 441

Removing Spots from, 206

Russian, 454

Varnish, 725

Waste Insulation, 426

      Waterproofing, 750

Leguminous Cheese, 176

Lemon Beer, 108

      Essences, 315

      Extract (Adulterated), 356

      Juice, Plain, 112

      Sherbet, 628

      Sour, 116

Lemons, 456

Lemonade, 109, 112

      for Diabetics, 109

      Powder, 627

      Preparations for the Sick, 109

Lemonades and Sour Drinks, 110

Lenses and their Care, 456

Letter-head Sensitizers, 537

Lettering, 456

      a Clock Dial, 737

      on Glass, 457

      on Mirrors, 457

Ley Pewter, 75

Lice Killers, 422

      Powders, 734

Lichen Removers, 4

Licorice, 458

      Syrup, 321

Liebermann's Bleaching Test, 246

Light, Inactinic, 154

Lilac Dye for Silk, 270

      Water Perfumery, 520

Limburger Cheese, 176

Lime, 33, 692

Limeade, 110

Lime as a Fertilizer, 339

      Bird, 458

      Juice, 112, 316

Lime-juice Cordial, 118

Limewater for Dyers' Use, 274

Lincoln Cheese, 176

Lincolnshire Relish, 213

Linen Bleaching, 120

 

Dressing, 444

      to Distinguish Cotton from, 246

Linoleum, 459

      Cleaning and Polishing, 206, 398

      Glue to Fasten, 14

Liniments, 459

      for Horses, 731

Lining for Acid Receptacles, 10

Linseed Oil, 34, 459

      Adulteration of, 460

      Bleaching of, 459

      for Varnish Making, 483

      or Poppy Oil, 484

      Refining, 484

      Solid, 483

Lipol, 226

Lipowitz Metal, 61, 65

Lip, Pomades, 226

      Salves and Lipol, 226

Liqueurs, 768

      to Clarify, 770

Liquid Bedbug Preparations, 421

      Bottle Lac, 440

      Bronzes, 135

      Cloth and Glove Cleaner, 195

      Court Plaster, 247

      Dentifrices, 256

      Dye Colors, 273

      for Bronze Powder, 567

      for Cooling Automobile Engines, 363

Liquids for Etching Steel, 327

Liquid Gold, 380

      Glues, 11

      Headache Remedies, 394

      Indelible Drawing Ink, 403

      Laundry Blue, 444

      Metal Polish, Non-explosive, 595

      Perfumes, 511, 515

      Polishes, 594

      Porcelain Cement, 28

      Rouge, 230

      Shampoos, 393

      Shoe Blackings, 633

      Soaps, 646

      Styrax Soap, 647

      Tar Soap, 647, 654

Liquor Ammonii Anisatus, 91

Liquors, 762

Lithia Water, 740

Lithographic Inks, 407

Lacquer, 440

      Paper, 505

Liver-spot Remedies, 241, 242

Lobelia-Indian Poke Poison, 95

 


[798]

 

INDEX

 

Locomotive Axles, Grease for, 462

Lubricants, 462

Locust Killer, 422

Logwood and Indigo Blue Dye, 268

London Soap Powder, 650

Lotion for the Hands, 232

Louse Wash, 423

Lozenges, Voice and Throat, 219

Lubricants, 460, 462

for Cutting Tools, 461

for Heavy Bearings, 461

for Highspeed Bearings, 461

for Lathe Centers, 461

for Redrawing Shells, 463

for Watchmakers, 738

Luhn's Washing Extract, 445

Luminous Paints, 494

Lunar Blend, 114

Lustrous Oxide on Silver, 641

Luster Paste, 464

Lutes, 32

 

[M]

 

Machine Bronze, 58

      Oil, 460

Machinery, to Clean, 200, 201, 203

      to Keep it Bright, 624

Macht's Yellow Metal, 63

Madder Lake Dye, 277

Magic, 610

      Bottles, 126

      Mirrors, 478

Magnesian Lemonade Powder, 627

      Orgeat Powder, 627

Magnesium, 49

      Citrate, 464

      Flash-light Powders, 552

Magnetic Alloys, 71

      Curves of Iron Filings, their Fixation, 464

      Oxide, 625

Magnolia Metal, 51

Mahogany, 784

Make Extract of Indigo Blue Dye, 268

Making Castings in Aluminum, 81

Malleable Brass, 54

Malt, Hot, 112

Malted Food, 359

Milk, 112, 474

Manganese Alloys, 72

      Amalgams, Applications of, 87

      Argentan, 70

      Copper, 72

Manganin, 72

Mange Cures, 731

Manicure Preparations, 226

Mannheim Gold or Similor, 68

Mantles, 465

Manufacture of Alcohol, 674

      of Cheese, 174

      of Chewing Gum, 178

      of Compounds Imitating Ivory,

Shell, etc., 429

      of Composite Paraffine Candles, 145

      of Glue, 10

      of Matches, 465

      of Pigments, 555

Manufacturing Varnish Hints, 715

Manures, 337

Manuscript Copying, 223

Maple, 784

Maraschino Liqueur, 770

Marble, Artificial, 699

      Cements, 16

      Cleaning, 196

      Colors, 699

      Etching, 327

      Painting on, 488

Marble, Polishing, 593

      Slabs, Cement for, 16

Marbling Crayons, 247

      Paper for Books, 505

Margerine, 143

Marine Glue, 13

      Paint to Resist Sea Water, 498

Marking Fluid, 465

      or Labeling Inks, 407

Maroon Dye for Woolens, 280

      Lake Dye, 277

Massage Application, 233

      Balls, 233

      Creams, 233

      Skin Foods, 233

      Soaps, 647

Mastic Lac, 441

Mat Aluminum, 81

      Gilding, 579

Mats for Metals, 470

Matches, 465

Match Marks on Paint, 195

      Phosphorus, Substitute for, 523

Materials, 172

      for Concrete Building Blocks, 691

Matrix for Medals, Coins, etc., 467

Matt Etching of Copper, 323

Matzoon, 468

May Bowl or May Wine, 770

Mead, 468

Meadow Saffron Poison, 95

Measures, 760

      to Clean, 204

Measuring the Weight of Ice, 402

Meat Extract Containing Albumen, 361

      Preservatives, 359, 360

      Products (Adulterated), 357

Medallion Metal, 62

Medal Impressions, 467

Medals, to Clean, 199

Medical Paste, 37

Medicated Cough Drops, 217

Massage Balls, 233

      Soaps, 647

Medicinal Wines, 771

Medicine Doses, 265

Meerschaum, 469

      Cements, 30

      Repairing, 27

Mending Celluloid, 161

      Porcelain by Riveting, 601

Menthol Cough Drops, 217

      Tooth Powder, 253

Mercury, Poison, 95

      Salves, 487

      Stains, to Remove, 186

Metacarbol Developer, 527

Metal and Paper Glue, 14

      Browning by Oxidation, 583

      Cements, 25

      Cleaning, 199

      Foil, 474

      Glass and Porcelain Cement, 25

      Inlaying, 249

      Lipowitz, 65

      Polishes, 595

      Protectives, 624

      Temperature of, 152

      Type, 78

      Varnishes, 725, 727

      Waterproof Cements for, 21

Metallic Articles, Soldering of, 656

      Cement, 163

      Coffins, 71

      Glazes on Enamels, 173

      Luster on Pottery, 173

Stain, 783

      Paper, 507

      Soaps, 648

Metals and Their Treatment, 469

      Brightening and Deadening, by Dipping, 469

      Bronzing, 567

      Cements for, 21, 24

      Coloring, 471

      Etching Powder for, 324

      Fusion Point of, 473

      How to Attach to Rubber, 22

      How to Bronze, 136

      Securing Wood to, 37

      Solution for Cleaning, 200

      to Silver-plate, 588

Metric System of Weights and Measures, 759

      Weights, 759

Meth, 468

Metheglin, 468

Method of Hardening Gypsum and Rendering it Weatherproof, 387

      of Purifying Glue, 378

Methods of Preparing Rubber

      Plasters, 562

Methyl Salicylate, to Distinguish from Oil of Wintergreen, 771

Metol and Hydrochinon Developer, 525

Metol-bicarbonate Developer, 525

Metol Developer, 524, 525

Mice Poison, 613

Microphotographs, 550

Milk, 354, 474

Milk as a Substitute for Celluloid, Bone, and Ivory, 148

      Cucumber, 239

      Extracts, 474

      Powder for Cows, 732

      Substitute, 475

      to Preserve, 475, 606

Minargent, 64

Mineral Acids, Poison, 92

      Oil, 484

      Waters, 739

Minofor Metal, 64

Mint Cordial, 765

      Julep, 114

Mirror Alloys, 72

Mirror-lettering, 457

Mirror Polishes, 593

      Silvering, 476

Mirrors, 476

      Frosted, 375

      to Clean, 209

      to Prevent Dimming of, 374

Miscellaneous Tin Alloys, 78

Mite Killer, 422

Mixed Birdseed, 120, 729

Mixers, Concrete, 693

Mixing Castor Oil with Mineral

      Oils, 484

Mixture for Burns, 142

Mocking-bird Food, 120, 729

Mock Turtle Extract, 212

Modeling Wax, 755

Modification of Milk for Infants, 473

Moisture, 426

Molding Sand, 478

Molds, 152

      of Plaster, 564

Moles, 479

Montpelier Cough Drops, 217

Mordant for Cement Surfaces, 479

for Gold Size, 479

Morphine Poison, 95

Mortar, Asbestos, 479

Mosaic Gold, 68, 140

      Silver, 140, 588

Mosquitoes, Remedies, 425

Moss Removers, 209

Moth Exterminators, 425

      Paper, 507

Moths and Caterpillars, 423

 


[799]

 

INDEX

 

Motors, Anti-freezing Solution for, 363

Mottled Soap, 654

Mountants, 479, 544

Mounting Drawings, etc., 479

      Prints on Glass, 480

Mousset's Alloy, 76

Moutarde aux Epices, 215

      des Jesuittes, 214

Mouth Antiseptics, 99

      Washes, 258

      Wash-tablets, 259

Moving Objects, How to Photograph Them, 548

Mucilage, 42

      Commercial, 43

      Creams, 238

      of Acacia, 43

      to Make Wood and Pasteboard

      Adhere to Metals, 43

Mulberry Dye for Silk, 272

Muriatic Acid Poison, 92

Mushroom Poison, 96

Music Boxes, 480

Muslin, Painting on, 488

Mustache Fixing Fluid, 480

Mustard, 214

      Cakes, 214

      Paper, 480

      Vinegar, 215

Myrrh Mouth Wash, 258

      Tooth Paste, 257

 

[N]

Nadjy, 115

Nail-cleaning Washes, 227

Nail, Ingrowing, 481

Polishes, 226

      Varnish, 227

Name Plates, Coating for, 501

Natural Glue for Cementing Porcelain, Crystal Glass, etc., 15

      Lemon Juice, 316

      Water, 739

Nature, Source and Manufacture of Pigments, 555

Neatsfoot Oil, 481

Needles, Anti-rust Paper for, 625

Negatives, How to Use Spoiled, 534

Nervine Ointment, 487

Nerve Paste, 481

Nets, 223

Neufchatel Cheese, 177

Neutral Tooth Powder, 255

New Celluloid, 155

      Mordant for Aniline Colors, 273

      Production of Indigo, 281

Nickel Alloys, 76

      Bronze, 70

Nickel-plating, 573

      with the Battery, 573

Nickel-testing, 481

Nickel, to Clean, 200

      to Remove Rust from, 199

Nickeled Surface, 589

Nickeling by Oxidation, 587

      Test for, 589

Niello, 683

Nitrate of Silver Poison, 95

      Spots, 198

Nitric Acid Poison, 92

      Stains to Remove, 185

Nitroglycerine, 329

Non-explosive Liquid Metal Polish, 595

Non-masticating Insects, 423

Non-Poisonous Textile and Egg Dyes for Household Use, 275

      Fly-papers, 347

Non-porous Corks, 224

Norfolk Cheese, 177

Normona, 115

Nose Putty, 230

Notes for Potters, Glass-, and Brick-makers, 164

Noyeau Powder, 628

Nut Candy Sticks, 216

Nutmeg Essence, 316

Nutwood Stain, 783

Nux Vomica Poison, 615

 

[O]

Oak, 775, 783

      Graining, 494

      Leather, Stains for, 455

      Stain, 783

      Wood Polish, 598

Odorless Disinfectants, 264

Odonter, 259

(Enanthic Ether as a Flavoring for Ginger Ale, 108

Oil, Carron, 242

      Castor, 153

      Clock, 482

Oilcloth, 459

      Adhesives, 36

Oil Extinguisher, 341

for Firearms, 460

      Grease-, Paint-spot Eradicators, 205

      How to Pour Out, 153

      Lubricating, 460

      Neatsfoot, 481

      of Cinnamon as an Antiseptic, 100

      of Vitriol Poison, 92

      Paintings, Lacquer for, 440

Protection for, 488

      Prints, Reproduced, 223

      Removers, 205

      Solidified, 461

      Stains for Hard Floors, 344

      Suitable for Use with Gold, 485

Oils, 482

      (Edible), Tests for, 355

      for Harness, 451

      Purification of, 335

Oilskins, 750

Oily Bottles, to Clean, 210

Ointments, 486

      for Veterinary Purposes, 731

Oleaginous Stamping Colors, 679

Olein Soap, 654

Oleomargarine, 142

Old-fashioned Ginger Beer, 107

      Lemonade, 110

Olive-oil Paste, 143

Onyx Cements, 16

Opium and All Its Compounds, Poison, 95

Optical Lenses, Cleaning, 208

Orangeade, 110

Orange Bitters and Cordial, 762, 764

      Drops, 216

      Dye, 271

      Extract, 316

      Flower Water, 520

      Frappé, 110

      Peel, Soluble Extract, 316

      Phosphate, 112

Ordinary Drab Dye, 281

      Green Glass for Dispensing Bottles, 373

      Negative Varnish, 544

Oreide (French Gold), 68

Orgeat Punch, 110

Ornamental Designs on Silver, 641

Ornaments of Iron, Blackening, 495

Orris and Rose Mouth Wash, 258

Ortol Developer, 527

Ox-gall Soap for Cleansing Silk, 654

Oxide, Magnetic, 625

      of Chrome, 172

      of Tin, 172

      of Zinc Poison, 97

Oxidized Steel, 584

Oxidizing, 139

      Processes, 581

Ozonatine, 44

 

[P]  

Package Pop, 107

      Wax, 755

Packing for Gasoline Pumps, 488

      for Stuffing Boxes, 488

Packings, 488

Pads of Paper, 488, 502

Pain-subduing Ointment, 487

Paint, Acid-resisting, 10

      Brushes, 490

at Rest, 141

Cleaning, 140

      Deadening, 491

      Dryers, 492

      for Bathtubs, 501

      for Blackboards, 489

      for Copper, 495

      for Iron, 496

      for Protecting Cement Against Acid, 9

      Grease, 229

      Peeling of, 501

      Removed from Clothes, 192

      Removers, 187

      to Prevent Crawling of, 490

      Varnish, and Enamel Removers, 187

Painters' Putty, 607

Painting on Leather, 455

      on Marble, 488

      on Muslin, 488

Ornaments or Letters on Cloth and Paper, 488

Over Fresh Cement, 499

      Processes, 488

Paintings, 488

      to Clean, 195

Paints, 489

      Dry Base for, 489

      for Gold and Gilding, 492

      for Metal Surfaces, 495

      for Roofs and Roof Paper, 497

      for Walls of Cement, Plaster, Hard Finish, etc., 498

      for Wood, 500

      Stains, etc., for Ships, 498

      Waterproof and Weatherproof, 499

Pale Purple Gold, 383

Pale-yellow Soap, 652

Palladium Alloys, 73

      Bearing Metal, 73

      Gold, 69

      Silver Alloy, 73

Palladiumizing, 583

Palms, their Care, 502

Panama Hat, How to Clean, 187

Paper, 502

      and Metal Glue, 14

      (Anti-rust) for Needles, 625

      as Protection for Iron, 625

      Blotting, 503

      Box Glue, 15

      Celloidin, 504

      Cements, 21

      Disinfectant, 263

      Fireproof, 344

      Floor Covering, 506

      Frosted, 374

Paperhangers' Pastes, 39

Paper Hygrometers, 402

      Making, Blue Print, 536

      on Glass, to Affix, 19

      Pads, 502

 


[800]

 

INDEX

 

Paper Pads, Glue for, 12

      Photographic, 527

      -sensitizing Processes, 536

      Tickets Fastening to Glass, 19

      Varnishes, 725

      Waterproofing, 505, 751

Papers, Igniting, 611

Papier-mâché, 502

Paraffine, 507

      Scented Cakes, 508

Paraffining of Floors, 345

Parchment and Paper, 502

      Cement, 21

Paste, 37

Paris Green, 561

      Red, 600

      Salts, 264

Parisian Cement, 30

Parmesan Cheese, 177

Parquet Floors, Renovating, 345

      Polishes, 591

Passe-partout Framing, 508

Paste, Agar-agar, 37

      Albumen, 37

      Antiseptic, 99

      Balkan, 38

Pasteboard Cement, 21

      Deodorizers, 399

Paste, Elastic or Pliable, 39

      for Affixing Cloth to Metal, 37-

      for Cleaning Glass, 208

      for Fastening Leather to

Desk Tops, etc., 36

      for Making Paper Boxes, 15

      for Paper, 37

      for Parchment Paper, 37

      for Removing Old Paint or Varnish Coats, 188

      for Tissue Paper, 37

      for Wall Paper, 39

      Flour, 39

      Ink to Write with Water, 416

      Permanent, 38

      that will not Mold, 37

      Venetian, 39

Pastes, 35

      for Paperhangers, 39

      for Polishing Metals, 595

      for Silvering, 588

      to Affix Labels to Tin, 39

Pastilles, Fumigating, 367

Pasting Celluloid on Wood, 36

Paper Signs on Metal 36

      Wood and Cardboard on Metal, 37

Pattern Letters and Figures, Alloys for, 80

Paving Brick, Stain for, 166

Patent Leather, 451

      Leather Dressings, 449

Polish, 633

Preserver, 453

Stains for, 452

Patina of Art Bronzes, 584

      Oxidizing Processes, 584

Patinas, 584

Peach Extract, 317

Tint Rouge, 231

Pearls, to Clean, 208

Peeling of Paints, 501

Pegamoid, 509

Pencils, Antiseptic, 99

      for Marking Glass, 374

Pen Metal, 74

Pens, Gold, 383

Peppermint as a Flavor, 252

Pepsin Phosohate, 112

Percentage Solution, 509, 704

Perfumed Ammonia Water, 91

      Fumigating Pastilles, 367

Pastilles, 520

Perfumes, 366, 509

      Coloring, 511

      Directions for Making, 512

      Fumigating, 366

      for Hair Oils, 520

      for Soap, 648

Permanent Patina for Copper, 585

      Paste, 38

Perpetual Ink, 404

Perspiration Remedy, 233

Perspiring Hands, 233

Petrolatum Cold Cream, 226

Petroleum, 521

      Briquettes, 522

      Emulsion, 423

      for Spinning, 522

      Hair Washes, 390

      Jellies and Solidified Lubricants, 461

      Soap, 648

Pewter, 75

      Aging, 522

      to Clean, 205

Phosphate Dental Cement, 163

      of Casein and its Production 149

Phosphor Bronze, 58

Phosphorescent Mass, 523

Photographers' Ointment, 487

Photographs, 554

Phosphorus Poison, 96, 614

      Substitute, 523

Photographic Developing Papers,

      Mountants, 41

Photographing on Silk, 540

Photographs Enlarged, 542

      on Brooches, 551

      Transparent, 545

Photography, 523

      without Light, 154

Piano Polishes, 598

Piccalilli Sauce, 213

Pickle for Brass, 132

      for Bronze, 138

      for Copper, 221

      for Dipping Brass, 132

Pickling Brass like Gold, 132

      Iron Scrap before Enameling, 305

      of German-silver Articles, 582

      Process, 453

      Spice, 214

Picric Acid Stains, 186

Picture Copying, 222

Postal Cards, 537

      Transferrer, 251

Pictures, Glow, 522

Pigment Paper, 540

Pigments, 555

Pile Ointments, 561

Pinaud Eau de Quinine, 392

Pinchbeck Gold, 69

Pineapple Essence, 317

      Lemonade, 110

Pine Syrup, 320

Pine-tar Dandruff Shampoo, 389

Ping-pong Frappé, 110

Pinion Alloy, 737

Pink Carbolized Sanitary Powder, 263

      Color on Silver, 642

      Dye for Cotton, 271

            for Wool, 271

Pinkeye, 731

Pink Grease Paint, 229

Purple Gold, 383

      Salve, 487

      Soap, 652

Pins of Watches, 738

Pin Wheels, 609

Pipe-joint Cement, 162

Pipe Leaks, 446

      to Color a Meerschaum, 469

Pipes, Rust-preventive for, 625

Pistachio Essence, 317

Plain Rubber Cement, 34

Plant Fertilizers, 336

Preservatives, 345

Plants, 561

Plaster, 561

      Articles, Repairing of, 27

      Cast of Coins, 150

      Casts, Preservation of, 565

      for Foundry Models, 564

      from Spent Gas Lime, 564

      Grease, 463

      Irritating, 486

      Model Lubricant, 463

      Mold, 152, 564

      Objects, Cleaning of, 564

      of Paris, Hardening, 32, 150, 564

      Repairing, 27

Plastic Alloys, 64

      and Elastic Composition, 158

      Metal Composition, 65

      Modeling Clay, 184

      Substances of Nitro-cellulose Base, 156

Polishing Paste, 600 [POSSIBLY NOT PROPERLY INDEXED]

Platina, Birmingham, 55

Plate Glass, Removing Putty, 206

Pewter, 75

Plates, Care of Photographic, 523

      for Engraving, 71

Platine for Dress Buttons, 80

Plating, 565

      Gilding and Electrotyping, 288

      of Aluminum, 572

Platinizing, 586

      Aluminum, 586

      Copper and Brass, 586

      Metals, 586

      on Glass or Porcelain, 586

Platinotype Paper, 530

Platinum Alloys, 73

      -gold Alloys for Dental Purposes, 74

Papers and Their Development, 529

Silver, 74

Solders, 665

      Waste, to Separate Silver from, 641

Platt's Chlorides, 264

Playing Cards, to Clean, 209

Plumbago, 460

Plumbers' Cement, 161

Plumes, 335

Plush, 590

to Remove Grease Spots from, 193

Poison Ivy, 96

Poisonous Fly-papers, 347

      Mushrooms, 96

Poisons, Antidotes for, 92

Polish for Beechwood Furniture, 593

      for Bronze Articles, 591

      for Copper Articles, 591

      for Fine Steel, 597

      for Gilt Frames, 600

      for Varnished Work, 195

Polishes, 590

      Bone, 395

      for Aluminum, 590

      for Bars, Counters, etc., 590

      for Brass, Bronze, Copper, etc., 590

      for Floors, 591

      for Furniture, 592

      for Glass, 593

      for Ivory, Bone, etc., 593

      for Pianos, 596

      for Silverware, 596

 


[801]

 

INDEX

 

 

Polishes, for Steel and Iron, 597

      for the Laundry, 444

      for Wood, 598

      or Glazes for Laundry Work, 444

Polishing Agent, 599

      Bricks, 600

      Cloths, to Prepare, 599

      Cream, 600

      Mediums, 600

      Pastes, 595

            for the Nails, 227

Powders, 594

      Soaps, 594

Polychroming of Figures, 501

Pomade, Putz, 203

Pomades, 277, 392

      Colors for, 228

      for the Lips, 226

Pomegranate Essence, 317

Poppy Oil, 484

      -seed Oil, Bleaching of, 459

Porcelain, 601

      How to Tell Pottery, 173

      Letters, Cement for, 19

Production of Luster Colors, 172

Portland Cement, 162

      Size Over, 30

Positive Colors, 556

Postal Cards, How to Make, 537

How to Make Sensitized, 539

Potassium Amalgams, Applications of, 86

      Silicate as a Cement, 19

Potato Starch, 680

Pottery, 173

      and Porcelain, How to Tell, 173

      Bodies and Glazes, 167

      Metallic Luster on, 173

      to Cut, 164

Poultry Applications, 419

      Foods and Poultry Diseases and Their Remedies, 733

      Lice Destroyer, 419

      Wine, 771

Pounce, 189

Powdered Camphor in Permanent Form, 144

      Cork as a Preservative, 606

      Nail Polishes, 226

Powder, Blasting, 330

      Face, 243

      for Cleaning Gloves, 195

      for Colored Fires, 609

      for Gilding Metals, 579

      for Hardening Iron, 427

      Roup, 734

      to Keep Moths Away, 425

      to Weld Wrought Iron at Pale-red Heat with Wrought Iron, 761

Powders for Stamping, 679

      for the Toilet, 242

Preservation and Use of Calcium Carbide, 144

      of Belts, 105

      of Carpets, 399

      of Drawings, 266

      of Eggs, 284

      of Fats, 335

      of Fishing Nets, 223

      of Fresh Lemon Juice, 456

      of Fruit Juices, 310

      of Gum Solution, 44

      of Meats, 359

      of Milk, 475

      of Plaster Casts, 565

      of Syrups, 701

      of Wood, 776

      of Yeast, 786

Preservative Fluid for Museums, 602

      for Stuffed Animals, 602

Preservatives, 602

Preservatives, for Leather, 452

Prairie Oyster, 116

Preparation of Amalgams, 85

of Brick Colors, 165

of Carbolineum,147

of Catgut Sutures, 155

of Celluloid, 156

of Emulsions of Crude Petroleum, 521

of Enamels, 308

of French Bronze, 136

of Syrups, 702

of Uninflammable Celluloid, 157

Preparations of Copper Water, 221

Prepared Mustards of Commerce, 214

Preparing Bone for Fertilizer, 338

Preparing Emery for Lapping, 289

Preservative for Stone, 602

Preservatives for Paste, 38

for Shoe Soles, 633

for Zoological and Anatomical Specimens, 602

Preserved Strawberries, 605

Preserving Antiques, 98

Eggs with Lime, 285

Meat, a German Method, 361

Pressure Table, 704

Preventing the Peeling of Coatings for Iron, 427

the Putrefaction of Strong Glues, 11

      Varnish from Crawling, 717

Prevention of Boiler Scale, 122

of Electrolysis, 123

of Fermentation, 765

of Foaming and Partial Caramelization of Fruit Juices, 311

of Fogging, Dimming and Clouding, 374

Prickly Heat, Applications for, 398

Priming Coat for Water Spots, 501

      Iron, 495

Print Copying, 222

Printing Ink, Savages, 409

Inks, 408

Oilcloth and Leather in Gold, 379

      on Celluloid, 161

on Photographs, 554

Printing-out Paper, How to Sensitize, 539

Printing-roller Compositions, 617

Prints, their Preservation, 309

Process for Colored Glazes, 165

for Dyeing in Khaki Colors, 276

of Electroplating, 286

of Impregnating Fabrics with Celluloid, 161

Production of Consistent Mineral

      Oils, 484 

of Lampblack, 441

of Luster Colors on Porcelain and Glazed Pottery, 172

of Minargent, 64

of Rainbow Colors on Metals, 568

of Substances Resembling Celluloid, 158

Properties of Amalgams, 85

of Concrete Blocks, Strength, 695

Protecting Boiler Plates from Scale, 122

      Cement Against Acid, 9

Stuffed Furniture from Moths, 425

Protection for Cement Work, 162

for Oil Paintings, 488

Protection of Acetylene Apparatus from Frost, 363

Protective Coating for Bright Iron Articles, 496

Prussic Acid, 93

Pumice Stone, 606

Pumice-stone Soap, 648

Pumillo Toilet Vinegar, 244

Punch, Claret, 112

Puncture Cement, 162

Purification of Benzine, 106

Purifying-air, 44

Purifying Oils and Fats, 335

      Rancid Castor Oil, 153

      Water, 740

Purple and Violet Dyes, 269

      Dye, 269

            for Cotton, 270

for Silk, 270

      Ink, 416

      of Cassius, 383

Putty, 606

      Acid-proof, 607

      for Attaching Sign-letters to Glass, 19

      for Celluloid, 161

      Nose, 230

      Substitute for, 608

      to Remove, 206

Putz Pomade, 203

Pyrocatechin Developer, 526

Pyrogallic Acid Stains, 185

Pyrotechnics, 608, 610

 

[Q]

Quadruple Extract Perfumery, 518

Quince Extract, 317

      Flip, 115

Quick Dryer for Inks Used on Bookbinders' Cases, 410

Quick-drying Enamel Colors, 722

Quick-water, 66

Quilts, to Clean, 194

 

[R]

Rags for Cleaning, 194

Raspberryade Powder, 627

Raspberry Essences, 318

      Lemonade, 110

      Sour, 116

      Syrup, 317, 318

Rat Poisons, 96, 613

Ratsbane Poison, 93

Ravigotte Mustard, 215

Razor Paper, 503

      Pastes, 509, 615

Recipes for Cold-stirred Toilet Soaps, 652

      for Pottery and Brick Work, 167

for Soldering, 665

Recovering Glycerine from Soap

      Boiler's Lye, 378

Recovery of Tin and Iron in Tinned-plate Clippings. 707

Recutting Old Files, 339

Red Birds, Food for, 729

      Coloring of Copper, 221

      Crimson and Pink Dyes, 270

      Dye for Wool, 271

      Furniture Paste, 592

      Gilding, 580

      Gold Enamel, 67

      Grease Paint, 229

      Indelible Inks, 406

      Ink, 416

      Patina, 585

Russia Leather Varnish, 449

Reducer for Gelatin Dry-plate Negatives, 535

 


[802]

 

INDEX

 

Reducers, 552

Reducing Photographs, 542

Refining Linseed Oil, 484

of Potato Starch, 680

Refinishing Gas Fixtures, 130

Reflector Metal, 72

Refrigerants, 615

Refrigeration, 616

Refrigerators, Home-made, 616

      their Care, 401

Regilding Mat Articles, 580

Reinking Typewriter Ribbons, 413

Relief Etching of Copper, Steel, and Brass, 323

Ground for, 322

of Zinc, 323

Relishes, 213

Remedies Against Human Parasites, 422

Mosquitoes, 425

for Dry Rot, 618

for Fetid Breath, 133

for Insect Bites, 417

Removable Binding, 141

Removal of Aniline-dye Staina

      from the Skin, 184

of Corns, 224

      of Dirt from Paraffine, 508

of Heat Stains from Polished Wood, 776

of Iron from Drinking Water, 741

of Musty Taste and Smell from Wine, 771

of Odors from Wooden Boxes, Chests, Drawers, etc., 398

of Paint from Clothing, 192

of Peruvian-balsam Stains, 194

of Picric-acid Stains, 186

of Rust, 199

Removing Acid Stains, 184

and Preventing Match Marks, 195

      Egg Stains, 201

Glaze from Emery Wheels, 289

Grease Spots from Plush, 193

Inground Dirt, 235

Ink Stains, 189

      Iron Rust from Muslin, 193

Odor from Pasteboard, 399

Oil Spots from Leather, 206

Oil Stains from Marble, 197

Old Wall Paper, 400

Paint from Wood, 188

Silver Stains, 209

Spots from Furniture, 206

the Gum of Sticky Fly-paper, 348

      Varnish, etc., 188

Window Frost, 376

Woody Odor, 399

Rendering Paraffine Transparent, 507

Renovating a Camera, 553

Old Parquet Floors, 345

Renovation of Polished Surfaces of Wood, etc., 197

Repairing Broken Glass, 26

Hectographs, 396

Rubber Goods, 620

Replacing Rubies whose Settings have Deteriorated, 736

Replating, 588

      with Battery, 573

Reproduction of Plaster Originals, 565

Resilvering, 588

      of Mirrors, 476

Restoring Photographs, 544

      Tarnished Gold, 199

Restoration of Brass Articles, 132

of Old Prints, 309

Restoration of Spoiled Beer, 105

      of the Color of Turquoises, 432

Retz Alloy, 64

Revolver Lubricants, 460

Rhubarb for Cholera, 180

Ribbon, Fumigating, 366

Ribbons for Typewriters, 711

Rice Paste, 38

Rifle Lubricants, 460

Ring, How to Solder, 666

Rings on Metal, Producing Colored, 582

Riveting China, 179

Roach Exterminators, 425

Rock-candy Syrup, 702

Rockets, 609

Rockingham Glazes, 171

Rodinal Developer, 524

Roller Compositions for Printers, 617

Roman Candles, 609

Roof Paints, 497

Roofs, How to Lay, 397

      Prevention of Leakage, 397

Room Deodorizer, 400

Rope Lubricants, 463

Ropes, 617

      Waterproofing, 753

Roquefort Cheese, 177

Rose's Alloy, 64

Rose Cordial, 765

      Cream, 115

Rose-Glycerine Soap, 652

Rosemary Water for the Hair, 389

Rose Mint, 115

      Pink Dye, 278

      Pomade, 227

      Poudre de Riz Powder, 243

      Powders, 230

      Talc, 510

Rose-tint Glass, 371

Rosewood, 783

      Stain, 783

Rosin, Shellac, and Wax Cement, 34

Soap as an Emulsifier, 289

Sticks, 260

      Tests for, in Extracts, 356

Rottmanner's Beauty Water, 244

Rouge, 228, 229, 230

      for Buff Wheels, 618

      or Paris Red, 600

      Palettes, 230

      Powder, 600

      Tablets, 230

      Theater, 231

Roup Cures, 734

Royal Frappé, 114

      Mist, 115

Rubber, 618

      and Rubber Articles, 620

Wood Fastened, 22

      Boots and Shoe Cement, 23

      Cement for Cloth, 24

      Cements, 22, 34

      Gloves, Substitute for, 100

Testing, 622

      Goods, Repairing, 620

      Its Properties and Uses in Waterproofing. 743

      Scraps, Treatment of, 621

      Softening, 621

      Stamps, 622

      Varnishes, 724

Ruby Settings, 737

Rules for Varnishing, 717

Rum, Bay, 104

Ruoltz Metal, 64

Russet Leather Dressing, 449

Russian Leather, 454

Polishing Lac, 411

Rust Paints, 497

      Paper, 625

Rust, Prevention for Iron Pipes, 625

      Preventive for Tools, etc., 625

Removers, 193, 198

      Preventives, 623

Rusty Pieces, to Separate, 625

 

 

[S]

Saccharine in Food, 351

Sachet Powders, 509

Safety in Explosives, 330

      Paper, 503

      Paste for Matches, 467

Sage Cheese, 176

Salicyl, Sweet, 258

Salicylic Acid in Food, 349

Soap, 654

Saltpeter (Nitrate of Potash), 96

Salts, Effervescent, 626

      Smelling, 628

Salve, 486

Sand, 628

      Holes in Brass, 150

            in Cast-brass Work, 150

Sand-lime Brick, 689

Sand Soap, 654

      to Prevent Adhesion of Sand to Castings, 150

Sandstone Cements, 17

      Coating, 10

      to Remove Oil Spots from, 198

Sapo Durus; 654

Saponaceous Tooth Pastes, 257

Sarsaparilla, 629

      Beer, 118

      Extract, 318

      Soluble Extract, 318

Sauces, Table, 213

Sausage Color, 358

Savage's Printing Ink, 409

Savine Poison, 96

Sawdust for Jewelers, 737

      in Bran, 126

Saxon Blue Dye, 268

Scald Head, Soap for, 653

Scale for Photographic Reduction, 542

      in Boilers, 122

Insects, Extermination of, 423

on Orange Trees, 423

      Pan Cleaner, 205

Scales and Tables, 547

Scalp Wash, 389

Scarlet Lake Dyes, 277

      with Lac Dye, 271

Schiffmann's Asthma Powder, 101

Scissors Hardening, 685

Scotch Beer, 118

Scratch Brushing, 576

Screws, 629

      Bluing, 682

      in Watches, 738

Sealing (Burning) Trick, 611

      Waxes, 755

Sea Sickness, 630

Seasonings, 213

Seed, Bird, 120

Seidlitz Salt, 628

Self-igniting Mantles, 465

Seltzer and Lemon, 110

      Lemonade, 110

      Water, 740

Separating Silver from Platinum Waste, 641

Serpents, Pharaoh's, 630

Serviettes Magiques, 596

Setting of Tools, 708

      the Paint-brush Bristles, 141

Sewing-machine Oil, 461

Sewing Thread, Dressing for, 706

Shades of Red, etc., on Matt Gold Bijouterie, 431

Shading Pen, Ink for, 416

 


[803]

 

INDEX

 

Shampoo Lotions and Pastes, 392

Soap, 653

Sharpening Pastes, 509

      Stones, 761

Shaving Paste, 630

      Soaps, 649

Sheep, 734

Sheet Brass, 54

Sheet-dips, 264

Sheet Metal Alloy, 71

      Lubricant, 463

Shellac, 716

      Bleaching, 631

Shell Cameos, 630

      Imitation of, 429

      Polishes, 593

Shells, Lubricants for Redrawing, 463

Sherbet, Egg, 115

Shims in Engine Brasses, 631

"Shio Liao," 32

Ship Compositions and Paints, 498

Shoe Dressings, 631

      Leather Dressing, 450

Shoes, Blacking for, 631

      Waterproofing, 750

Show Bottles, 127

Show-case Signs, 457

Show Cases, 635

      to Prevent Dimming of 374

Siberian Flip, 115

Siccatives, 636

Sign Letters, 639

Sign-letter Cements, 18

Signs on Show Cases, 457

      to Repair Enameled, 304

Silicate of Oxychloride Cements, 35

Silicon Bronze, 61

Silk, 639

      Gilding, 580

Sensitizers for Photographic Purposes, 540

Silver, 639

      Alloys, 75

      Amalgam, 88, 90

      Bromide Paper, Toning Baths for, 541

      Bronze, 71

Silver-coin Cleaner, 200

Silver, Copper, Nickel, and Zinc Alloys, 76

      Etching Fluid for, 324

      Fizz, 115

      Foil Substitute, 474

      Gray Dye for Straw, 269

Stain, 783

      Imitation, 77

      Ink, 416

      Nitrate Spots, to Remove, 194

Test for Cottonseed Oil, 482

Ornamental Designs on, 641

Silver-plating, 574, 587

Silver Polishing Balls, 599 

Solder for Enameling, 434

for Plated Metal, 434

Solders, 663  

            for Soldering Iron, Steel, Cast Iron, and Copper, 663

      Testing, 642

      to Clean, 204

      to Color Pink, 642

      to Recover Gold from, 382

Silvering by Oxidation, 583

      Bronze, 587

      Copper, 587

      Glass Balls, Amalgam for, 90

Globes, 641

      Globes, 476

      of Mirrors, 476

      Powder for Metals, 642

Silver-plating, and Desilvering, 587

      Test for, 642

Silverware Cleaner, 200

      Polishes, 596

      Wrapping Paper for, 506

Silver-zinc, 76

Similor, 68

Simple Coloring of Bronze Powder, 134

      Test for Red Lead and Orange Lead, 446

Way to Clean a Clock, 207

Sinews, Treatment of, 11

Sinks, to Clean, 202

Size Over Portland Cement, 31

Sizing, 38

      Walls for Kalsomine, 436

Skin Bleaches, Balms, etc., 234

      Chapped, 232

Skin-cleaning Preparations, 184

Skin Cream, 239

      Discoloration, 235

      Foods, 231, 234

      Lotion, 234

      Ointments, 487

      Troubles, 644

Slate, 643

      Dye for Silk, 269

for Straw Hats, 269

      Parchment, 506

Slides for Lanterns, 532

Slipcoat or Soft Cheese, 177

Slugs on Roses, 423

Smaragdine, 45

Smelling Salts, 510, 628

Smokeless Powder, 329

      Van-colored Fire, 609

Smut, Treatment for, 384

Snake Bites, 96, 643

Soap, Benzoin, 652

Soap-bubble Liquids, 655

Soap, Coloring, 644

      for Surgical Instruments, 653

      for Garment Cleaning, 645

      Perfumes, 520

      Polishes, 594

      Powder, Borax, 649, 650

      Substitutes, 653

      Tooth, 257

Soaps, 644

      and Pastes for Gloves, 195

      for Clothing and Fabrics, 191

Soda, Coffee Cream, 113

      Water, 111

Soda-water Fountain Drinks, 110

Sodium Amalgams, Applications of, 86

      Salts, Effervescent, 627

      Silicate as a Cement, 19

Soft Enamels for Iron, White, 305

      German-silver Solder, 661

      Glaze Brick, 1.65

      Gold Solder, 434

      Metal Castings, 151

      Silver Solders, 664

Soldering Paste, 667

Solder, 664

      Toilet Soaps, 652

Softening Celluloid, 160

      Rubber, 621

      Steel, 687

Solder, Copper, 659

      for Articles which will not Bear a High Temperature, 666

      for Brass Tubes, 659

      for Fastening Brass to Tin, 659

      for Gold, 434

      for Iron, 665

      for Silver Chains, 664

      for Silver-plated Work, 664

      for Silversmiths, 664

      from Gold, to Remove, 383

Soldering, Acids, 656

      a Ring Containing a Jewel, 436, 666

      Block, 667

Soldering, Concealed, 665

      of Metallic Articles, 656

      of Metals, 655

      Fluxes for, 660

      Paste, 667

      Powder for Steel, 665

      Recipes, 665

      Solution for Steel, 665

      without Heat, 666

Solders, 655

      for Glass, 662

      for Gold, 434

      for Jewelers, 436

      for Silver, 434

Solid Alcohol, 45

      Cleansing Compound, 209

      Linseed Oil, 483

Solidified Lubricants, 462

Soluble Blue, 443

      Essence of Ginger, 314

      Extract of Ginger Ale, 108

      Glass, Bronzing with, 139

      Gun Cotton, 332

Solution for Removing Nitrate of Silver Spots, 194

Solutions for Batteries, 104

      for Cleaning Metals; 200

      Percentage, 704

Solvent for Iron Rust, 201

Solvents for Celluloid, 160

Sorel's Dental Cement, 163

Soup Herb Extract, 212

Sources of Potable Alcohol, 668

Sozodont, 256

Sparkling Wines, 767

Sparks from the Finger Tips, 611

Spatter Work, 457

Spavin Cures, 730

Spearmint Cordial, 765

Special Glazes for Bricks, 167

Specific Gravity Test, 382

Speculum Metal, 73

Spice for Fruit Compote, 605

      Pickling, 214

Spices, Adulterated, 358

      for Flavoring, 213

Spirit, 667, 678

Stains for Wood, 784

Spirits of Salts Poison, 92

Sponge Trick, Blazing, 611

      Window Display, 679

Sponges, 678

      as Filters, 339

Sterilization of, 679

      to Clean, 210

Spot and Stain Removers, 185

      Gilding, 580

Spots on Photographic Plates, 554

Sprain Washes, 730

Spray Solution, 103

Spring Cleaning, 207

      Hardening, 685

Springs of Watches, 737

      to Clean, 207

Sprinkling Powders for Flies, 421

Spruce Beer, 118, 119

Squibb's Diarrhcea Mixture, 179

Squill Poisons, 613

Stage Decorations, Fireproofing, 342

Stain, Brick, 133

      for Blue Paving Bricks, 166

Stain-removing Soaps, 653

Stained Ceilings, 400

Staining Horns, 397

Stains, 781

      for Lacquers, 438

      for Oak Leather, 455

      for Patent Leather, 452

      for Wood, 781

            Attacked by Alkalies or Acids, 785

Stamping, 679

      Colors for Use with Rubber

Stamps, 679

 


[804]

 

INDEX

 

Stamping Liquids and Powders, 679

      Powder for Embroideries, 680

Starch, 445, 680

      in Jelly, Tests for, 357

      Luster, 399

      Paste, 35

      Powder, 681

Starch-producing Plants, 668

Statuary Bronze, 57

Statue Cleaning, 197

Statuettes, Cleaning of, 564

of Lipowitz Metal, 64

Steam Cylinder Lubricant, 463

Steel, 681

      Alloys, 77

            for Drawing Colors on, 80

for Locomotive Cylinders, 77

      and Iron Polishes, 597

      Blue and Old Silver on Brass, 130

      Bluing, 682

      Bronze, 61

      Browning of, 682

      Cleaner, 199

      Coloring, 682

      Distinguishing Iron from, 427

      Dust as a Polishing Agent, 600

      Etching, 323

on, 687

      Fragments, 687

Steel-hardening Powder, 427

Steel, Oxidized, 584

      Paint for, 497

      Plating, 575

      Polishes, 597

Soldering, 665

      Testing, 687

      to Clean, 199

      Tools, to Put an Edge on, 686

      Wire Hardening, 684

Stencil Inks, 411

      Marking Ink that will Wash Out, 399

Stencils for Plotting Letters of

Sign Plates, 296

Stereochromy, 688

Stereopticon Slides, 532

Stereotype Metal, 77

Sterilization of Sponges, 679

      of Water with Lime Chloride, 741

Sterling Silver, 434

Stick Pomade, 228

Sticky Fly-papers, 347

      Fly Preparations, 421

Stilton Cheese, 177

Stone, Artificial, 688

      Cements, 16

      Cleaning, 196

      Preservative for, 602

Stones for Sharpening, 708, 761

      (Precious), Imitation of, 370

Stoneware, 167

      and Glass Cements, 26

      Waterproof Cements for, 21

Stopper Lubricants, 462, 700

Store Windows, to Clean, 209

Stove, Blacking, 700

      Cement, 162

      Cleaners, 202

      Lacquer, 441

      Polish, 597, 700

Varnishes, 727

Stramonium, Antidote for, 102

Strap Lubricant, 460

Strawberries, Preserved, 605

Strawberry Essence, 318

      Juice, 318

      Pomade, 227

Straw, Bleaching, 120

      Fireproofing, 343

Straw-hat Cleaners, 187

      Dyes, 394

Strengthened Filter Paper, 503

Stripping Gilt Articles, 205

      Photograph Films, 553

Strong Adhesive Paste, 37, 39

      Cement, 32

      Twine, 223

Strontium Amalgams, 86

Stropping Pastes, 615

Strychnine or Nux Vomica, 96

      Poisons, 614

Stuffed Animals, Preserved, 602

Styptic Paste of Gutta Percha, 701

Styptics, 701

Substances Used for Denaturing Alcohol, 678

Substitute for Benzine, 106

for Camphor in the Preparation of Celluloid arid Applicable to Other Purposes, 157

      for Cement on Grinder Disks, 31

      for Cork, 224

      for Fire Grenades, 341

      for Gum Arabic, 386

      for Putty, 608

      for Rubber Gloves, 100

      for Soldering Fluid, 659

Substitutes for Coffee, 210

      for German Silver, 70

      for Wood, 785

Suffolk Cheese, 177

Sugar-producing Plants, 668

Sulphate of Zinc Poison, 97

      Stains, to Remove, 186

Sulphuric Acid Poison, 92

Summer Drink, 118

      Taffy, 217

Sun Bronze, 61

      Cholera Mixture, 179

Sunburn Remedies, 240, 241

Sunflower-glycerine Soap, 653

Superfatted Liquid Lanolin-glycerine Soap, 647

Sutures of Catgut, 155

Swiss Cheese, 177

Sympathetic Inks, 412

Syndeticon, 32

Syrup of Bromoform, 134

      (Raspberry), 317

      Table, 704

Syrups, 321, 701

Szegedin Soap, 653

 

[T]

Table of Drops, 704

      Sauces, 213

      Showing Displacement on Ground Glass of Objects in Motion, 548

Top, Acid-proof, 9

Tables, 703

      and Scales, 547

      for Photographers, 547

Tablet Enameling, 293

Tablets, Chocolate Coated, 179

      for Mouth Wash, 259

      Glue for, 13

Taffy, 217

Tailor's Chalk, 164

Talc Powder, 243

Talcum Powder, 243

Tallow, 334

Talmi Gold, 69

Tamping of Concrete Blocks, 695

Tan and Freckle Lotion, 241

      and Russet Shoe Polishes, 633

Tank, 705

Tanned Leather, Dye for, 447

Tanning, 453

      Hides, 454

Taps, to Remove Broken, 705

Tar Paints, 780

Tarragon Mustard, 215

Tar Syrup, 320

Tasteless Castor Oil, 153

Tattoo Marks, Removal of, 705

Tawing, 448

Tea Extract, 319

      Hot, 113

Tea-rose Talc Powder, 243

Teeth, to Whiten Discolored, 705

Telescope Metal, 71

Temperature for Brushes, 140

      of Metal, 152

      of Water for Plants, 561

Tempered Copper, 221

Tempering Brass, 132

      Steel, 683

Terra Cotta Cleaning, 197

      Substitute, 705

Test for Glue, 10

Testing Nickel, 481

      Rubber Gloves, 622

      Siccatives, 637

      Silver, 642

      Steel, 687

Tests for Absolute Alcohol, 45

for Aniline in Pigments, 560

      for Cotton, 245

      for Lubricants, 463

      for Yeast, 786

Textile Cleaning, 191

Theater Rouge, 231

The Burning Banana, 611

      Gum-bichromate Photoprinting Process, 546

      Preservation of Books, 124

      Prevention of the Inflammability of Benzine, 106

Therapeutic Grouping of Medicinal Plasters, 561

Thermometers, 706

Thread, 706

Three-color Process, 548

Throat Lozenges, 218

Thymol, 100

Ticks, Cattle Dip for, 419

Tiers-Argent Alloy, 75

Tilemakers' Notes, 164

Tin, 49, 706

      Alloys, 77

      Amalgams, Applications of, 87

      Ash, 172

      Bismuth, and Magnesium, 49

      Bronzing, 567

      Chloride of Tin, Poison, 97

Tinctures for Perfumes, 513

Tin, Etching Fluid for, 324

Tinfoil, 707

Tin Foils for Capsules, 474

      for Wrapping Cheese, 474

Tin in Powder Form, 707

Tin-lead, 77

      Alloys, 78

Tinned Surface, 589

Tinning, 584

      by Oxidation, 584

Tin Plating by Electric Bath, 575

      of Lead, 589

Tinseled Letters, or Chinese Painting on Glass, 458

Tin Silver-Plating, 589

      Solders, 665

      Statuettes, Buttons, etc., 78

      Varnishes, 727

Tipping Gold Pens, 383

Tire, 708

      Cements, 23

Tissier's Metal, 64

Tissue Paper, Paste for, 37

To Ascertain whether an Article is Nickeled, Tinned, or Silvered, 589

      Attach Glass Labels to Bottles, 41

Gold Leaf Permanently, 474

 


[805]

 

INDEX

 

Tobin Bronze, 61

      To Blacken Aluminum, 81

      Bleach Glue, 378

Tobacco Poison, 97

To Bronze Copper, 136

Burnish Gilt Work, 384

Caseharden Locally, 684

Cast Yellow Brass, 54

Cement Glass to Iron, 17

Clarify Liqueurs, 770

            Solutions of Gelatin, Glues, etc., 370

Turbid Orange Flower Water, 512

Clean a Gas Stove, 202

Aluminum, 204

Articles of Nickel, 201

Brushes of Dry Paint, 188

            Colored Leather, 186

            Dull Gold, 204

            Files, 205

            Fire-gilt Articles, 185

Furs, 368

            Gilt Frames, etc., 185

            Gilt Objects, 203

            Gold and Silver Lace, 193

            Gummed Parts of Machinery, 203

            Gummed-up Springs, 207

            Jet Jewelry, 431

            Lacquered Goods, 195

            Linoleum, 206

            Milk Glass, 209

            Mirrors, 209

            Oily Bottles, 210

            Old Medals, 199

            Painted Walls, 190

            Paintings, 195

            Petroleum Lamp Burners, 200

            Playing Cards, 209

            Polished Paits of Machines, 201

            Quilts, 194

            Silver Ornaments, 201

            Skins Used for Polishing Purposes, 186

            Soldered Watch Cases, 207

            Sponges, 210

            Store Windows, 209

            Tarnished Zinc, 205

            the Tops of Clocks in Repairing, 20

            Very Soiled Hands, 185

            Watch Chains, 206

            Wool, 273

            Zinc Articles, 203

Coat Brass Articles with Antimony Colors, 581

Color a Meerschaum Pipe, 469

            Billiard Balls Red, 428

            Bronze, 138

            Butter, 359

            Cheese, 359

            Gold, 383

            Iron Blue, 427

            Ivory, 428

      Conceal Soldering, 665

Copper Aluminum, 581

Copy Old Letters, etc., 223

Cut Castile Soap, 644

            Glass, 371

To Cut Glass under Water, 372

      Pottery, 164

Toddy, Hot Soda, 112

To Detect Artificial Vanillin in Vanilla Extracts, 713

      the Presence of Aniline in a Pigment, 560

Tonka in Vanilla Extract, 714

Determine the Covering Power of Pigments, 560

Dissolve Copper from Gold Articles, 382

To Distinguish Cotton from Linen, 246

            Genuine Diamonds, 260

Glue and Other Adhesives, 378

            Iron from Steel, 427

Steel from Iron, 687

Do Away with Wiping Dishes, 399 

      Drain a Refrigerator, 616

Drill Optical Glass, 372

Dye Copper Parts Violet and Orange, 221

            Cotton Dark Brown, 280

Feathers, 282

Felt Goods, 281

Silk a Delicate Greenish Yellow, 280

            Silk Peacock Blue, 281

Stiffen, and Bleach Felt

            Hats, 273

Woolen Yarns, etc., Various Shades of Magenta, 280

Woolens with Blue de Lyons, 280

      Eat Burning Coals, 612

Estimate Contents of a Circular Tank, 705

      Extract Oil Spots from Finished Goods, 273

Shellac from Fur Hats, 394

Fasten Brass upon Glass, 17

Paper Tickets to Glass, 19

Rubber to Wood, 22

Fill Engraved Letters on Metal Signs, 457

Find the Number of Carats, 432

Fire Paper, etc., by Breathing on it, 611

Fix Alcoholic Lacquers on Metallic Surfaces, 440

Dyes, 274

Gold Letters, etc., upon glass, 18

Paper upon Polished Metal, 37

            Iron in Stone, 162

Fuse Gold Dust, 384

Give a Brown Color to Brass, 130

            a Green Color to Gold Jewelry, 582

Brass a Golden Color, 577

Dark Inks a Bronze or Changeable Hue, 409

Grind Glass, 372

Harden a Hammer, 684

Hard-solder Parts Formerly

Soldered with Tin Solder, 663

Impart the Aroma and Taste of Natural Butter to Margarine, 143

Improve Deadened Brass Parts 132

      Increase the Toughness, Density, and Tenacity of Aluminum, 83

Toilet Creams, 235

Milks, 239

Powders, 242

Soap Powder, 652

Toilet Soaps, 650

Vinegars, 244

Waters, 244, 519

To Keep Files Clean, 339

      Flaxseed Free from Bugs, 424

Flies from Fresh Paint, 501

Ice in Small Quantities, 402

India Ink Liquid, 407

Liquid Paint in Workable Condition, 501

Keep Machinery Bright, 624

Tolidol Developer, 52  

To Loosen a Glass Stopper, 700

a Rusty Screw in a Watch Movement, 738

Tomato Bouillon Extract, 212

Tombac Volor on Brass, 130

To Make a Belt Pull, 106

      a Clock Strike Correctly, 738

a Transparent Cement for Glass, 29

Cider, 180

Corks Impermeable and Acid-proof, 10

Fat Oil Gold Size, 382

Holes in Thin Glass, 372

Loose Nails in Walls Rigid, 399

      or Enlarge a Dial Hole, 737

Pluah Adhere to Metal, 590

Matt Gilt Articles, 432

Mend Grindstones, 386

            Wedgwood Mortars, 29

Toning Baths, 540

            for Silver Bromide Paper, 541

      Black Inks, 409

Tonka Extract, 319

      Its Detection in Vanilla Extracts, 714

Tool Lubricant, 461

      Setting, 708

Tools, Rust Prevention, 625

Toothache, 709

Tooth Cements, 163

      Paste to be put in Collapsible Tubes, 257

Pastes, Powders, and Washes, 251

      Powder for Children, 255

Powders and Pastes, 253

Soaps and Pastes, 257

Straightening, 737

To Overcome Odors in Freshly Prepared Rooms, 400

Paint Wrought Iron with Graphite, 496

      Paste Paper on Smooth Iron, 37

Pickle Black Iron-plate Scrap Before Enameling, 305

Polish Delicate Objects, 599

      Paintings on Wood, 600

Prepare Polishing Cloths, 599

Preserve Beef, 360

Furs, 368

Milk, 606

            Steel from Rust, 199

Prevent Crawling of Paints, 490

Dimming of Eyeglasses, etc., 376

            Glue from Cracking, 10

Screws from Rusting and Becoming Fast, 629

Smoke from Flashlight, 552

the Adhesion of Modeling Sand to Castings, 150

the Trickling of Burning Candles, 145

            Wooden Vessels from Leaking, 446

Produce Fine Leaves of Metal, 473

Protect Papered Walls from Vermin, 401

            Zinc Roofing from Rust, 626

Purify Bismuth, 380

Put an Edge on Steel Tools, 686

Quickly Remove a Ring from a Swollen Finger, 431

Reblack Clock Hands, 738

Recognize Whether an Article is Gilt, 383

      Recover Gold-leaf Waste, 381

Reduce Engravings, 310

 


[806]

 

INDEX

 

To Reduce Photographs, 548

Refine Board Sweepings, 432

Remedy Worn Pinions from Watches, 738

Remove a Name from a Dial, 207

            Aniline Stains, 185

from Ceilings, etc., 190

Balsam Stains, 194

Black Letters from White Enameled Signs, 639

Burnt Oil from Hardened Steel, 686

            Eamel and Tin Solder, 188

Fragments of Steel from Other Metals, 687

Finger Marks from Books, etc., 186

            Glue from Glass, 208

Gold from Silver, 382

Grease Spots from Marble, 197

Hard Grease, Paint, etc., from Machinery, 200

Ink Stains on Silver, 201

Nitric-acid Stains, 185

Oil-paint Spots from Glass, 209

            Oil-paint Spots from Sandstones, 198

Old Enamel, 189

Old Oil, Paint, or Varnish Coats, 187

Paint, Varnish, etc., from Wood, 188

Putty, Grease, etc., from Plate Glass, 206

Pyro Stains from the Fingers, 555

            Red (Aniline) Ink, 190

Rust from Instruments, 199

Rust from Iron Utensils, 198

Rust from Nickel, 199, 203

Silver Plating, 203

Silver Stains from White Fabrics, 193

            Soft Solder from Gold, 383

Spots from Drawings, 206

Spots from Tracing Cloth, 192

            Stains from the Hands, 184

Stains of Sulphate, 186

Strains in Metal by Heating, 686

            Varnish from Metal, 188

Vegetable Growth from Buildings, 209

Water Stains from Varnished Furniture, 188

Vaseline Stains from Clothing, 192

Render Aniline Colors Soluble in Water, 274

Fine Cracks in Tools Visible, 686

Gum Arabic More Adhesive, 43

            Negatives Permanent, 553

Pale Gold Darker, 383

Shrunken Wooden Casks Watertight, 149

Window Panes Opaque, 375

Renew Old Silks, 274

Renovate and Brighten Russet and Yellow Shoes, 633

Brick Walls, 190

Old Oil Paintings, 488

Straw Hats, 187

Repair a Dial, etc., with Enamel Applied Cold, 737

a Repeating Clock-bell, 737

Enameled Signs, 304

Meerschaum Pipes, 469

Restore Brushes, 141

            Patent Leather Dash, 452

To Restore Reddened Carbolic Acid, 147

      the Color of a Gold or Gilt Dial, 207

Burnt Steel, 686

Tortoise-shell Polishes, 593

To Scale Cast Iron, 204

      Scent Advertising Matter, 510

Separate Rusty Pieces, 625

Silver Brass, Bronze, Copper, 587

Glass Balls and Plate Glass, 587

      Silver-plate Metals, 588

Soften Glaziers' Putty, 607

Horn, 397

Iron Castings, 427

Old Whitewash, 762

Solder a Piece of Hardened Steel, 665

      Stop Leakage in Iron Hot Water Pipes, 446

Sweeten Rancid Butter, 143

Take Boiling Lead in the Mouth, 612

Tell Genuine Meerschaum, 469

Temper Small Coil Springs and

      Tools, 683

Test Extract of Licorice, 458

Fruit Juices and Syrups for Aniline Colors, 321

Fruit Juices for Salicylic Acid, 321

            the Color to See if it is Precipitating, 277

Tighten a Ruby Pin, 738

Toughen China, 173

Transfer Designs, 710

            Engravings, 710

Turn Blueprints Brown, 542

Utilize Drill Chips, 686

Touchstone, Aquafortis for the, 383

Toughening Leather, 455

To Weaken a Balance Spring, 733

Whiten Flannels, 446

            Iron, 427

      Widen a Jewel Hole, 431

Tracing-cloth Cleaners, 194

Tracing Cloth, Removing Spots from, 192

Tracing, How to Clean, 194

      Paper, 503

Tragacanth, Mucilage of, 42

Transfer Processes, 710

Transparencies, 709

Transparent Candles, 145

Brick Glaze, 167

Ground Glass, 373

Photographs, 545

Soaps, 652

Trays, Varnish for, 727

Treacle Beer, 119

Treatment and Utilization of Rubber Scraps, 621

of Bunions, 224

of Carbolic-acid Burns, 147

of Cast-iron Grave Crosses, 202

of Corns, 225

of Damp Walls, 400

of Fresh Plaster, 564

of Newly Laid Linoleum, 459

of the Grindstone, 386

Tricks with Fire, 608

Triple Extract Perfumery, 513

      Pewter, 75

Tubs: to Render Shrunken Tubs Water-tight, 149

Turmeric in Food, 352

Turpentine Stains, 784

Turquoises, Restoration of the Color of, 432

Turtle (Mock) Extract, 212

Twine, 711

Strong, 223

Two-solution Ink Remover, 189

Type Metal, 78

Typewriter Ribbon Inks, 413

Ribbons, 711

 

[U]

Udder Inflammation, 731

Unclassified Alloys, 80

      Dyers' Recipes, 273

Unclean Lenses, 456

Uninflammable Celluloid, 157

United States Weights and Measures, 758

Uniting Glass with Horn, 17

      Rubber and Leather, 22

Universal Cement, 31

      Cleaner, 209

Urine, Detection of Albumen, 44

Utensils, Capacities of, 703

      to Remove Rust, 198

Utilization of Waste Material or By-products, 673

 

 

[V]

Valves, 711

Vanilla, 713

      Extract, 319, 355

      Substitute, 714

Vanillin, 713

Vaseline Pomade, 228

      Stains, to Remove, 192

Vasolimentum, 728

Varnish and Paint Remover, 188

      Bookbinders', 720

      Brushes at Rest. 141

      for Bicycles, 719

      for Blackboards, 720

      for Floors, 724

      for Trays and Tinware, 727

      Gums Used in Making, 715

      How to Pour Out, 153

      Making, Linseed Oil for, 483

      Manufacturing Hints, 715

      Removers, 187

      Substitutes, 727

Varnished Paper, 506

Varnishes, 543, 714

      Engravers', 723

      Insulating, 426

      Photographic Retouching, 543

Varnishing, Rules for, 717

Vat Enamels and Varnishes, 721

Vegetable Acids, Poison, 92

Vegetables, Canned, 352

Vehicle for Oil Colors, 560

Venetian Paste, 39

Vermilion Grease Paint, 229

Vermin Killer, 422

Very Hard Silver Solder, 663

Veterinary Dose Table, 729

      Formulas, 728

Vichy, 740

      Salt, 628

Violet Ammonia, 244, 245

      Color for Ammonia, 91

      Cream, 115

      Dye for Silk or Wool, 270

for Straw Bonnets, 270

      Flavor for Candy, 217

      Ink, 417

      Poudre de Riz Powder, 242

      Sachet, 510

      Smelling Salts, 510

      Talc, 510

Powder, 243

      Tooth Powder, 252

      Water, 520

Witch Hazel, 245

Vinaigre Rouge, 244

Vinegar, 358, 734

      Toilet, 244

Viscose, 159

 


[807]

 

INDEX

 

Vogel's Composition Files, 64

Voice Lozenges, 219

Vulcanization of Rubber, 622

 

[W]

 

Wagon and Axle Greases, 462

Wall Cleaners, 190

Wall-paper Dyes, 278

Removal of, 400

Wall-paper Paste, 39

Wall Priming, 501

      Waterproofing, 741

Walls, Damp, 400

      Hard-finished, 499

Walnut, 783

Warming Bottle, 127

Warping, Prevention of, 781

Warts, 736

Washes, Nail-cleaning, 227

Washing Blankets, 399

      Brushes, 141

      Fluids and Powders, 445

      of Light Silk Goods, 639

Waste, Photographic, Its Disposition, 534

Watch Chains, to Clean, 206

Watch-dial Cements, 20

Watch Gilding, 738

Watch-lid Cement, 20

Watchmakers' Alloys, 736

      and Jewelers' Cleaning Preparations, 206

      Formulas, 736

      Oil, 738

Watch Manufacturers' Alloys, 736

      Movements, Palladium Plating of, 583

Waterproof and Acid-proof Pastes, 38

      Cements for Glass, Stoneware, and Metal, 21

      Coatings, 742

      Glues, 13

      Harness Composition, 451

      Ink, 417

      Paints, 491

      Papers, 505

      Putties, 608

      Ropes, 753

      Shoe Dressings, 634

      Stiffening for Straw Hats, 187

      Varnish for Beach Shoes, 635

Wood, 753

Waterproofing, 741

      Blue Prints, 741

      Brick Arches, 741

      Canvas, 742

      Cellars, 400

      Corks, 742

      Fabrics, 742

      Leather, 750

      Paper, 751

Water- and Acid-resisting Paint, 499

Water-closets, Deodorants for, 263

Water, Copper, 221

      Filters for, 339

Water-glass Cements, 19

Water Glass in Stereochromatic Painting, 688

      Jackets, Anti-freezing Solutions for, 363

      Natural and Artificial, 739

      Purification, Alum Process of, 340

      Spots, Priming for, 501

      Stains, 784

Water Stirred Yellow, Scarlet and Colorless, 612

Water-tight Casks, 149

      Glass, 373

      Roofs, 373

"Water Tone" Platinum Paper, 529

      to Freeze, 616

      Varnish, 544

Waters, Toilet, 244

Wax, 753

      Burning, Trick, 611

      for Bottles, 553

      for Ironing, 444

      for Linoleum, 459

      Paper, 505

Waxes for Floors, Furniture, etc., 754

Weather Forecasters, 756

Weatherproofing, 499

      Casts, 565

Weed Killers, 262

Weights and Measures, 757

      of Eggs, 284

Weiss Beer, 119

Welding Compound, 687

      Powder to Weld Steel on Wrought Iron at Pale-red Heat, 761

      Powders, 761

Westphalian Cheese, 177

Wheel Grease, 462

Whetstones, 761

Whipped Cream, 247, 248

White Brass, 55

      Bricks, 164

      Coating for Signs, etc., 490

      Cosmetique, 228

      Face Powder, 243

      Flint Glass Containing Lead, 373

      Furniture, Enamel for, 722

      Glass for Ordinary Molded

Bottles, 373

      Glazes, 167

White-gold Plates Without Solder, 384

White Grease Paints, 229

      Ink, 417

      Metals, 78

White-metal Alloys, 79

White Metals Based on Copper, 79

Based on Platinum, 79

      Pine and Tar Syrup, 320

      Petroleum Jelly, 462

      Portland Cement, 162

      Rose Perfumery, 518

      Shoe Dressing, 635

      Solder for Silver, '434

      Stamping Ink, 417

            for Embroidery, 411

      Vitriol, Poison, 97

Whitewash, 761

      to Remove, 190

Whiting, 761

Whooping-cough Remedies, 211

Wild-cherry Balsam, 103

      Extract, 321

Wiltshire Cheese, 177

Window-cleaning Compound, 208

Window Display, 762

      Panes, Cleaning, 208

Opaque, to Render, 375

      Perfume, 762

      Polishes, 593

Windows, Frosted, 376

      to Prevent Dimming of, 376

Wine Color Dye, 270

Wines and Liquors, 762

      Medicinal, 771

      Removal of Musty Taste, 771

Winter Beverages, 117

Wintergreen, to Distinguish Methyl Salicylate from Oil of, 771

Wire Hardening, 684

Rope, 771

Witch-hazel Creams, 238

      Jelly, 228

      Violet, 245

Wood, 772

Acid-proof, 9

      Cements, 26

      Chlorine-proofing, 9

      Fillers, 773

      Fireproofing, 342

Wooden Gears, 463

Wood Gilding, 580

      Polishes, 598

      Pulp, Fireproofing, 343

      Renovators, 194, 197

      Securing Metals to, 37

Stain for, 781

      Substitutes for, 785

Warping, to Prevent, 781

Waterproofing, 753

Wood's Metal, 64

Woodwork, Cleaning, 194

Wool Oil, 485

      Silk, or Straw Bleaching, 120

      to Clean, 273

Woorara Poison, 97

Worcestershire Sauce, 213

Working of Sheet Aluminum, 83

Worm Powder for Stock, 732

Wrapping Paper for Silverware, 506

Wrinkles, Removal of, 231, 233

Writing Inks, 414

      on Glass, 376, 405

      on Ivory, Glass, etc., 405

      on Zinc, 405

      Restoring Faded, 786

     

[Y]

Yama, 116

Yeast, 786

      and Fertilizers, 339

Yellow Coloring for Beverages, 119

      Dye for Cotton, 271

for Silk, 271

      Hard Solders, 658

      Ink, 417

      Orange and Bronze Dyes, 271

      Stain for Wood, 784

Ylang-Ylang Perfume, 518

Yolk of Egg as an Emulsifier, 290

York Cheese, 177

 

 

[Z]

Zapon, 728

      for Impregnating Paper, 506

      Varnishes, 728

Zinc, 49

      Alloys, 80

      Amalgam for Electric Batteries, 89

for Dentists' Zinc, 163

Amalgams, Applications of, 87

      Articles, Bronzing, 136

to Clean, 203

      Bronzing, 137, 567

      Contact Silver-plating, 589

      Etching, 323

      Gilding, 580

Zinc-Nickel, 80

Zinc Plates, Coppering, 573

      Poison, 97

      to Clean, 205

  


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